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Speaker Abstracts & Bios

Keynote speakers

  • David Wallom, Oxford e-Research Centre
    Networks binding the 21st Century University
  • Mark Johnson, Chief Technology Officer, MCNC
    Optical and hybrid optical/packet networks
  • Phil Edholm, Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Strategy, Nortel
    Networking Discontinuities - Opportunities and Challenges

    Plenary speakers

  • Ashley D. Lloyd, Curtin Business School
    Extending an innovator's 'reach': The Grid and (one) international eSocial Science collaboration
  • Colin Carati, Flinders University
    Medical Applications for Advanced Networking
  • Dr Rod BadgerDeputy Secretary, Information Economy Division, DCITA
    ICT enabling e-Research and Online Collaboration

    Collaboration Infrastructure and Technology

  • Andrew Alexander, Commander Australia
    Communication as the facilitator for Knowledge Management and driver for competitive advantage
  • Andrew Rutherford,IAGU Networks
    Demonstration and Panel discussion on H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging.
  • Ian Atkinson, James Cook University
    Communication as the facilitator for Knowledge Management and driver for competitive advantage
  • Janos G Fekete, Product Manager, Converged Products, NEC Business Solutions
    SIP Realities Presentation
  • Jon Farrell, Dimension Data Australia
    Collaboration using LCS Instant Messaging Telephony
  • Karl Turnbull, Griffith University
    Storage Virtualisation
  • Nigel Barling, CSIRO
    H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging
    Video Conferencing Upgrade - Lessons Learnt
  • Robert Dolphin, Senior Architect, Nortel
    Enabling Secure Realtime Media with SIP
  • Rodney G. McDuff, The University of Queensland
    SIP ain't SIMPLE
    Demonstration and Panel discussion on H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging.
  • Roger Tolhurst, Charles Sturt University
    Asterisk VoIP - extending and complementing the PABX
  • Scott Sinclair, The University of Queensland
    The University Ecosystem, or presence and what it means for you
  • Simon Downey, Face To Face Communications International Limited
    Video Streaming and Content Management for Educators
  • Stephen Kingham, AARNet
    H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging
  • Steve Cox, Flinders University
    H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging
    Demonstration and Panel discussion on H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging.
  • Steve Johnston, Edith Cowan University
    Demonstration and Panel discussion on H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging.
  • Tim Rayner, Charles Sturt University
    Asterisk VoIP - extending and complementing the PABX

    e-Research Infrastructure

  • Charles Smith, Cisco Academic Research & Technology Initiatives
    Evolution of the NREN to support a simplified distributed super-computing network architecture

  • Craig Stevens, Cisco
    Factoring Lower Networking Layers into the GRiD
  • Jeff McDonell, Monash University
    DART - developing toolkits for e-Research
  • Peter Bahas, University of Technology Sydney
    e-nabling eResearch through next generation networks
  • Shane Moore, EMC Corporation
    Managing Grid Computing
  • Terry Sloan, Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre
    Standards based access to a distributed European supercomputing infrastructure

    Governance

  • Chris Disspain, CEO, auDA
    Internet Governance - A national and international challenge
  • Jon Mason, Editor, e-Framework
    Update on the e-Framework for Education and Research
  • Kerry Blinco, Consultant, e-Framework
    Update on the e-Framework for Education and Research
  • Kevin Dillon, Juniper Networks
    Extending Advanced IP Services across multiple administrative domains: the Ipsphere Initiative
  • Peter Grant, Assistant Director-General, Office of Government ICT
    Governance in a Web Services World - We have got one Chance to Get it Right

    Networks for Education and Research

  • Andre Winarto, Optus Business
    ICT Industry Trends and Industry Consolidation
  • Anthony Cross, NSW Department of Education & Training
    AEDN, a Network of Networks
  • Chris Richter, New England TAFE NSW
    AEDN, a Network of Networks
  • Doug Farmer, Project Development Manager, AARNet
    Connecting the Australian Education & Research Communities: The AARNet Optical Network
  • Greg Wickham, Infrastructure Development, AARNet
    Connecting the Australian Education & Research Communities: The AARNet Optical Network
  • Guido Aben, Technical Business Development Manager, AARNet
    AEDN, a Network of Networks
  • Ivan Philips, Infrastructure Specialist, AARNet
    Connecting the Australian Education & Research Communities: The AARNet Optical Network
  • James Tizard, SABRENet Ltd
    The South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet)
  • John Butkiewicz, Chief Adviser to the Managing Director, Huawei Technologies (Australia) Pty Ltd
    Building the Secured Campus Network
  • Paul Davis, GrangeNet
    What you can do in five years with a few million dollars
  • Rob McIntyre, Powerlink Queensland
    Powerlink Queensland: Supporting Telecommunications for Tertiary Education in Queensland

    Next Generation Education

  • Chris Grist, QUT Web Team, QUT
    Digital Natives - Engage Them or Enrage Them
  • Derek Powell, The University of Queensland
    The UQ Advanced Concept Teaching Space
  • Matt Bailey, QUT Web Team, QUT
    Digital Natives - Engage Them or Enrage Them
  • Russell Colbert, Global Education Market Director, Polycom
    Interactive content - accessing, preparation and provision of relevant content for to day's knowledge student
  • Tracey Wilen-Daugenti, Internet Business Solutions, Cisco Systems
    The 21st Century University

    Network Security

  • Barry Lynam, QUT
    BoF: Findings from a recent SEIM (Security Event Information Management) Proof of Concept and product evaluation
  • Peter Hole, Nortel and Macquarie University
    The Great Paradox - Cost-effective Security in a Permissive and Distributed Environment
  • Andrew Bycroft, Regional Sales Engineer, ANZ, Fortinet Inc
    Putting Colour into Grey Applications: IM and P2P
  • Geoff Sweeney: Chief Technical Officer, Tier-3
    Can you even see the risks that are threatening your enterprise?
  • Grae Meyer-Gleaves, Data#3
    Logical Separation and Protection of Hosts on your Network
  • Ian Gilchrist, TippingPoint
    Network Security and the Evolution of IPS
  • John Humphreys, Infoblox
    Identity Driven Networks - Challenges and Solutions for Education
  • John Zornig, The University of Queensland
    The Australian Higher Education and Research sectors Certification Authority Federation
  • Paul Ducklin, Sophos
    Enabling New Technologies Without Disabling Your Network
  • Viviani Paz, AusCERT
    The Australian Higher Education and Research sectors Certification Authority Federation

    Networking Technology and Architecture

  • Andrew Alexander, Commander Australia
    "Building a Convergent Network" a report on the NORTEL Network Infrastructure implementation project at JCU
  • Bradley Beddoes, Senior Network Programmer, Network Applications, Queensland University of Technology
    Federated middleware architectures, how QUT are applying Shibboleth and the MAMS project to the ATN Group of Universities egrad school and to the wider QUT Authentication SSO System
  • Bruce Williams, Griffith University
    Virtual Server Campus Network Design and Disaster Recovery
  • Carl Van Wyk, James Cook University
    "Building a Convergent Network" a report on the NORTEL Network Infrastructure implementation project at JCU
  • Glen Turner, Network Design Engineer, AARNet
    Campus QoS design (delegates: please bring network diagrams of your campus edge and core)
  • Glynn Rogers, CSIRO ICT Centre
    Internet flow control - improving on TCP
  • Mike Hicks, Principal Consultant for Advanced Networking, Compuware
    Preparation is the key to deploying and managing converged networks
  • Paul Brauer, Netstar Networks Australia
    Swinburne - The fully Converged Network
  • Richard Constantine, CIO and Director, Swinburne University
    Swinburne - The fully Converged Network
  • Rod Swile, Network Programmer, Queensland University of Technology
    QUT IPAMS Upgrade Project 2003: From Delegation to Deployment
  • Shaun Mangelsdorf, Network Programmer, Network Applications, Queensland University of Technology
    Federated middleware architectures, how QUT are applying Shibboleth and the MAMS project to the ATN Group of Universities egrad school and to the wider QUT Authentication SSO System
  • Sudath Wijeratne, Griffith University
    Virtual Server Campus Network Design and Disaster Recovery

    Diverse Technologies

  • Gerry Wind, Telstra Extended Enterprise Solutions
    RFID the next phase in the information age
  • Jonathan Bays, Business Manager, Lan1
    Delivering always on wireless broadband to economically motivated rural areas

    Wireless and eduroam

  • Mark Barnett, Engineering Manager, ATI Australia
    Planning and Deploying Broadband Wireless - A WiMax case study
  • Nick Bromhead, Nortel, Asia Pacific Wireless Solutions Manager
    Emerging wireless broadband technologies
  • Stephen Walsh, Australian Catholic University
    eduroam wireless implementation - lessons learned

    Birds of a Feather

  • [BoF] for all members of the AARNet community especially RNO Technical Advisory and Management Group
  • Barry Lynam, QUT
    BoF: Findings from a recent SEIM (Security Event Information Management) Proof of Concept and product evaluation
  • Glen Turner, Network Design Engineer, AARNet
    [BoF] Campus QoS design (delegates: please bring network diagrams of your campus edge and core)
  • James Sankar, Director for Application and Services, AARNet
    [BoF] Video over IP Survey - results, conclusions and next steps, followed by discussion
  • Kewin Stoeckigt, AARNet
    [BoF] Video over IP Survey - results, conclusions and next steps, followed by discussion
  • Malcolm Caldwell, Charles Darwin University and Deputy Chair of the AARNet VIDEO Working Group
    [BoF] Video over IP Survey - results, conclusions and next steps, followed by discussion
  • Steve Cox (Flinders University)
    [BoF] Discuss activities and progress of the AARNet IPTEL Working Group


    Abstracts and Bios

    Charles Smith

    Bio:

    Charles Smith is a senior consulting engineer in the Cisco Academic Research & Technology Initiatives (ARTI) Organisation. He specialises in new network infrastructure technologies and architectures for higher education and research. Charles in particular was the senior network architect for a number of National Research Networks (NRN's) including the Taiwan (TWAREN), the California (CENIC), United States National Lambda Rail (NLR) and Australian Optical (AARNet) research and education backbones. His current role in Cisco includes liaison activities with network related research and national research networks in the Asia pacific region, China and Japan. Before joining Cisco Charles has had an extensive career in computer related networking as manager of the network team at the Australian Seismological Centre, the department of defence and as a consultant to government agencies on TCP/IP architectures.

    [index]

    Evolution of the NREN to support a simplified distributed super-computing network architecture

    Abstract:

    This seminar gives a short history in the evolution of National Research & Education Network Architectures. In particular case studies of a number of NREN's will be discussed demonstrating today¡¦s best practices and architectures. The discussion then leads on to their possible evolution towards a fully distributed network infrastructure model supporting a network layered approach to super-computing as an alternate or addendum to the existing large centralised clusters & software application suites.

    Charles Smith is a senior consulting engineer in the Cisco Academic Research & Technology Initiatives (ARTI) Organisation. He specialises in new network infrastructure technologies and architectures for higher education and research. Charles in particular was the senior network architect for a number of National Research Networks (NRN's) including the Taiwan (TWAREN), the California (CENIC), United States National Lambda Rail (NLR) and Australian Optical (AARNet) research and education backbones. His current role in Cisco includes liaison activities with network related research and national research networks in the Asia pacific region, China and Japan. Before joining Cisco Charles has had an extensive career in computer related networking as manager of the network team at the Australian Seismological Centre, the department of defence and as a consultant to government agencies on TCP/IP architectures.

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    Derek Powell

    Bio:

    Derek Powell is passionate about the possibilities for technology in the hands of the upcoming generation of students to transform the ways people engage and learn at university. As UQ Manager, Teaching Technology Support, he was a pivotal figure in the team that delivered the Australia¡¦s first, purpose built Collaborative Learning Centre, designing and integrating around $1.5M of technology into the seven rooms. He conceived the Advanced Concept Teaching Spaces concept (a radical experimental didactic teaching space to be built at UQ in 2007) and is directing the technology research and development effort within the University which will bring it to fruition.

    As well as qualifications in Communications and Management Derek brings a broad perspective to the application of technology as his previous experience includes integration of AV and IT into spaces ranging from function and event centres to Expo pavilions. In a wider sense, his focus on technically mediated communication includes experience in broadcast and video production with scores of short subjects to his credit. Derek also writes regularly in the popular and technical press on audio and video technology.

    [index]

    The UQ Advanced Concept Teaching Space

    Abstract:

    The University of Queensland is engaged in a process of building and evaluating new kinds of teaching spaces which have the concept of connected learning stations at their heart. The presentation will review the design and implementation of two of these spaces (see details below) with particular reference to the key relationship in teaching space: the pedagogy-space-technology nexus. The presentation will be based in part on workshops presented by the author to the University of Melbourne and RMIT in April 2006 and on work currently underway at UQ to establish a coherent and comprehensive framework for guiding the design of new learning spaces that is the subject of significant grant applications.

    The Collaborative Learning Centre

    The St Lucia Collaborative Learning Centre within the Sir James Foots building at UQ recognises that learning does not only happen in the classroom ¡V it is a social and a learning space. Launched in mid-2005, this two-level Centre comprises a series of innovative formal and informal teaching and learning spaces equipped with state-of-the art technologies. It is a completely new type of learning environment ¡V neither a didactic lecture theatre, nor a seminar room, nor a computer laboratory ¡V although it has some elements of each. It stretches our conceptions of teaching and learning and the affordances of space for this endeavour. Altogether, there are seven teaching spaces in the Centre, with two 90-seat collaboration spaces allowing three distinct learning modes: individual study mode; presentation mode; collaborative learning or ¡§pod¡¨ mode. It is easy to reconfigure a space, physically and electronically and to move between learning modes. Some spaces are equipped with videoconferencing facilities and access grid endpoints.

    Students can relax and continue the learning experience beyond formal teaching areas. Wireless network technologies extend to adjoining outdoor areas and a coffee shop, and into wide external corridors equipped with data points, plasma screens and connections for student and teacher interaction. Comfortable chairs, data projectors which can be used individually by students or in a group fashion by teachers, study pods, flexible furniture arrangements, and touch screen kiosks and display areas for student messages are all part of the concept. There are areas for photocopying, printing and social areas for all students.

    The UQ Advanced Concept Teaching Space

    The University has an ambitious plan to create several Advanced Concept Teaching Spaces

    (ACTS) working prototypes of the interactive classroom of the future that pushes the envelope in the design of the traditional lecture theatre. These interactive classrooms will be several steps beyond ¡§state of the art¡¨. They will be avowedly experimental teaching spaces designed to demonstrate and prove the value of advanced teaching systems and methods. It will make available to academics and students teaching technology that we do not expect to be commonplace for at least a decade into the future. The ACTS project is squarely aimed at advancing the pedagogy of one-to-many teaching ¡V lectures and seminars ¡V and discovering how we can add value for students in this critical teaching mode. It enable new research on teaching, develop new teaching techniques and tools and become an international centre of excellence. The goal is to create the first Advanced Concept Teaching Space by no later than 2007, planned to be part of the teaching spaces in the General Purpose building (GPN4) to be constructed on the St Lucia Campus.

    In function, the Advanced Concept Teaching Spaces will be a lecture theatre, and in form, many aspects will be familiar. There will be a ¡§lectern¡¨, seating for students and a screen to display AV materials but we expect there to be much more besides. The room will host many systems which will explore the possibilities of maximising two-way communication between the academic and the class. The fundamental plan will be to incorporate emerging technology used in new ways. Using technology similar to aircraft systems, each seat will have an individual screen which will function both as a display and a control/response system via touch screen facilities. This will allow a host of innovative services, which will be able to be tailored to each teaching requirement.

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    Gerry Wind

    Bio:

    Gerry was with Australia Post for 18 Years, in various roles, such as Manager State Parcels Centre Queensland, Strategic Planning role and Regional Training Manager.

    In 1995 he started work with IGC International Aid, providing support for orphans through sponsorship, for more than 5000 orphans in three developing nations. His role was to restructure the organisation, commencing with the Australian Head Office, then each of the projects, in the Philippines, Uganda and Zambia. This resulted in him taking up residence in Uganda, for 3 years. During this time he was also responsible for Donor Relations in Europe.

    In 1998 he started with Amcor Fibre Packaging. Last four years as National Manager Supply Chain Development. Gerry was responsible for new technologies, their application to the movement of goods and associated data transfers. He was responsible for RFID projects within Amcor and assisting Amcor customers with B2B Supply Chain solutions. He developed and implemented a "world first" RFID enabled warehouse. Location determination by RFID tags in the floor. Paper Reel tracking, by placing a passive RFID tag in the core of the paper reel. This was interfaced with the Warehouse Management and Production Scheduling Systems.

    Gerry spent 2005 with Sunshine Technologies as a Senior Consultant focusing on supply chain deployment of RFID. In this role he focused on Primary Industries, Mining and Health Care applications.

    In Jan 2006 Gerry started with Telstra Extended Enterprise Services as Senior Technical Specialist, focusing on end-to-end RFID solutions within Australian and New Zealand businesses.

    Gerry has spoken at numerous conferences in australia and overseas on RFID. (Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Taiwan, Austria, Malaysia)

    [index]

    RFID the next phase in the information age

    Abstract:

    What is Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), what we have learned about the technology?

    o    Reality check on RFID, looking behind the hype

    o    What frequencies to use and why

    o    Global frequencies and allowable power

    o    Current technology limitations

    o    How to overcome the problems with Water and Metal

    o    Standards, where they are at, how they are likely to affect future systems

    o    EPC - Numbering system

    o    Reader & tag communication

    o    Reader interference "RTF Versus TTF"

    Driving forces behind RFID

    o    Retail mandates

    o    Governmental Legislation

    o    Supply Chain Efficiencies - cost reduction.

    Case Studies - What we did at Amcor

    o    RFID location determination in the warehouses

    o    RFID Tagged Paper Reels and Warehouse.

    [index]

    Glynn Rogers

    Bio:

    Glynn Rogers began his professional career as a microwave development Engineer. After 15 years in geophysical imaging, he entered data networking in 1994 and played a key role in establishing a research program in advanced telecommunications networks within CSIRO. This focused on Quality of Service issues, initially in the context of ATM but later in IP networks particularly the Differentiated Services concept. In the initial phase of the CSIRO Centre for Networking Technologies for the Information Economy (CeNTIE), he led the networking research group which explored the emerging area of network virtualization from a services perspective. He is currently leading a project in autonomous network traffic control in the CSIRO ICT Centre.

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    Internet flow control - improving on TCP

    Abstract:

    Flow control is a critical aspect of internet technology and the stability of the current network is largely due to the successful experimental development of TCP over the last two decades. However it is increasingly recognised that TCP in its current form is inadequate to meet the needs of the emerging high speed Internet and a new generation of applications. Indeed it has been demonstrated that it is actually unstable in a high bandwidth delay product environment. Consequently much current activity is aimed at developing either improved versions of or alternatives to TCP. DCCP has recently reached RFC status with XCP and TCP-Fast in the draft stage. In addition, a number of transport protocols have been developed for special purposes such as Tsunami in astronomy.

    From the perspective of the Internet as a whole, the problem is technically challenging. The totality of controlled sources and internal congestion control mechanisms constitutes a complex, distributed, nonlinear feedback control system and ensuring it¡¦s stability is a major design issue. Fortunately an underlying mathematical model has been developed at Cambridge which has been shown, in retrospect, to underlie the main TCP protocols. TCP Fast is based on it and XCP can also be fitted into this context.

    The CSIRO ICT Centre has combined this theoretical framework with the emerging virtual networks concepts to develop a flow management system to provide several Classes of Service. This tackles the complexity of the problem by partitioning it into internal and external components. The internal component deals with aggregate flows within a provider¡¦s network while the external component ensures that individual end host sources meet the flow conditions imposed at the access points by the internal flow management system. An experimental version of this system has been constructed over the CeNTIE Research Network and used to demonstrate both the viability of the architecture and the stability of the control system. XCP fits well into this context and has been adopted as the external protocol using the cloud approach proposed in the original XCP paper.

    The presentation will provide an overview of the flow control architecture and control system but will focus on the performance of the overall system using a mixture of NS2 simulation and experimental results. It is hoped that it will also provide some insight into the emerging advanced flow control techniques and a demonstration that they can be implemented in practice.

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    Grae Meyer-Gleaves

    Bio:

    Grae Meyer-Gleaves has information security experience and skills in management, consulting, architecture and engineering. Grae began his career in information security while working as part of a specialist unit which designed, installed and maintained the Australian Defence Forces secure communications network for Queensland.

    Grae comes from a background where he has managed, designed, architected and implemented secure information systems. Grae has worked in a number of different industry sectors which include: defence, banking and finance, government, mining and retail.

    [index]

    Logical Separation and Protection of Hosts on your Network

    Abstract:

    Most of the major vendors now have solutions to logically separate hosts on your network. In addition, some of the technologies allow you to quarantine hosts based on patch levels, antivirus signatures being updated and other criteria. In some instances, the technology allows you to apply patches and settings prior to trusting and connecting them to your critical information systems.

    This presentation will aim to explore some of the solutions out there at a high level. How your organisation can benefit from the use of logical separation of hosts on your network will be covered. Some of the myths will be answered and questions such as ¡§how are we going to manage this¡¨ will be explored. Specific solutions such as Microsoft¡¦s Network Access Protection (NAP) and Cisco¡¦s Network Admissions Control (NAC) will be compared and untangled.

    The presentation will highlight and discuss:

    o    The threats and risks currently faced by organisations with their networks and the hosts that connect to them (both wanted and unwanted). Examples such as roaming employees, external consultants and malicious entities connecting to the network will be covered;

    o    Discuss and compare some of the various high level approaches being offered by vendors at different layers of the OSI model. Examples of how some fit together whereas some a totally isolated will be covered;

    o    How the investment can be justified within an organisation

    o    The operational impact, both positive and negative which results from implementing typical solutions on offer;

    o    How to get the most from an investment in logical separation and protection of hosts on the network; and

    o    Managing the solution, short and long term.

    The proposed presenters will be a combination of Grae Meyer-Gleaves and Mathew Boulenaz.

    [index]

    James Tizard

    Bio:

    James began his professional IT career in the early 1980¡¦s at the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, and worked for the next twelve years writing software in a variety of research environments. Since the mid 1990¡¦s has held a number of ICT policy roles with the South Australian Government, including eighteen months in the office of a State Government IT Minister.

    Prior to taking on the SABRENet role, James was Director, Information and Communications Technology in the State Government's Science, Technology and Innovation Directorate. He sees is current role as a welcome move back into ¡§doing stuff¡¨.

    [index]

    The South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet)

    Abstract:

    SABRENet is an optical-fibre telecommunications network currently being constructed to link major Research & Education sites in metropolitan Adelaide. The SABRENet project partners are Flinders University, the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia, the South Australian Government and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO).

    SABRENet will comprise 92 km of new underground duct and cable and 10km of member-owned fibre and duct space.

    The SABRENet infrastructure will be owned and managed by SABRENet Ltd, a non-profit public company formed by the project partners.

    SABRENet is currently being constructed by Amcom Telecommunications Pty Ltd under contract to SABRENet Ltd. Construction began in January 2006, and is scheduled to complete in December 2006. The SABRENet construction is funded by grants from the Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST) supported by cash and in-kind member contributions.

    Once completed, SABRENet will form part of the Australian Research & Education Network (AREN)

    The presentation will cover the following:

  •     Background & history

  •            Governance ¡V the genesis of SABRENet Ltd

  •            Tender processes

  •            SABRENet architecture and technology overview

  •            Planned and potential uses of the network

  •            Stakeholder relationships

  •            Commercial relationships

  •            Supporting e-Research

  •            Acceptable Use and Asset Management policies

  •            Challenges and lessons learned

  •            Future plans.

    The presentation will be accompanied by photographs and short video clips of the SABRENet construction.

    Web site: http://www.sabrenet.edu.au

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    John Humphreys

    Bio:

    John is an ex-pat New Zealander who has been working in Silicon Valley for 20 years. He is a veteran of the IT industry and has spent much his career developing and marketing enterprise class networking and security products. Prior to joining Infoblox, John held senior positions in Hewlett-Packard, UB Networks, Madge Networks, and Ramp Networks. John holds a Bachelor of Commerce from Victoria University and an MBA from Northwestern University.

    [index]

    Identity Driven Networks - Challenges and Solutions for Education

    Abstract:

    Networking professionals in Australian schools and universities must meet the needs of many communities: students, faculty, administration, and others. These communities often expect different services and are more or less willing to accept centralized policies and management of their networking services.

    Adding to this complexity is the trend of explosive growth in the number and types of network users, devices, and applications. Demands on the network are growing from new applications such as mobile networks and voice over IP (VoIP), new security measures for perimeter protection, and new government regulations. This paper will examine conventional solutions for delivering basic network identity services¡Xsuch as assigning IP addresses to devices (DHCP), providing domain name services (DNS), authenticating users (RADIUS), and distributing policies (LDAP) and argue that these approaches are under stress because they were not designed for the levels of reliability, scalability, security, or control needed to meet current and emerging requirements.

    We will examine some of the key issues in addressing this emerging network identity crisis. The paper will discuss approaches to building identity-driven networks (IDNs), in which user and application-level security, accountability, and auditability are built into the network fabric. IDNs provide substantial benefits, including:

  •      Control over access to network and application resources based on machine identity, user identity, endpoint state, location, and time.

  •      Rich definition of policies based on a range of static and dynamic factors, including users, devices, applications, and network state.

  •      Multi-layer enforcement of policies via control over IP address assignment, port-based access control, end-point state, and network quarantine.

  •     Complete visibility for monitoring, troubleshooting, and compliance reporting based on users, devices, addresses, policies, and network activity.

    The paper will draw on case studies from Australian and U.S. universities to help illustrate trends and solutions.

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    Jon Farrell

    Bio:

    Jon Farrell¡¦s IT experience spans more than twenty years. During this time, his work has encompassed data communications, voice, video & data Integration, and collaborative technologies.

    Jon joined Dimension Data as Systems Engineer in 1996, focusing on Infrastructure and NOS Technologies from vendors including Cisco Systems and Microsoft. As part of his role, Jon delivered pre-sales and post-sales solutions for numerous large clients.

    In 2004, Jon completed the Microsoft Live Communications Server (LCS) Airlift, and also counts Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert (CCIE) among his qualifications.

    Before moving to Dimension Data, Jon spent 5 years supporting the LAN/WAN and NOS environments around Novell, Cisco and Microsoft technologies for the Victoria Police IT department.

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    Collaboration using LCS Instant Messaging Telephony

    Abstract:

    Instant Messaging has proven to be a double edged sword for organisations. While wide-spread productivity benefits of this technology are well known, the threat of security breaches and corporate misuse result in most organisations either disregarding or even banning this exciting technology. Microsoft¡¦s entry into this space with Live Communications Server (LCS) resolves these issues. LCS provides a secure, scalable, enterprise-grade Instant Messaging (IM) and presence solution, together with telephony capabilities (third party call control).

    LCS, together with its SIP-based client, Microsoft Office Communicator, provides an instant message and presence awareness infrastructure for IT organisations that want to provide their employees with the power of collaborative tools without the potential security and legal exposure that comes with free IM. It also enables enterprises to reclaim corporate identity from public services such as MSN, AOL and Yahoo. LCS also extends IM and other real-time communication capabilities to trusted partners, customers and suppliers and supports peer-to-peer audio, video, application-sharing and data collaboration.

    Collaborative Infrastructure is defined as any technology that enables people to collaborate with other people or other processes such as workflow. Emerging technology in this area will become a major factor in the quest for greater productivity. Dimension Data has been proactive in building significant skills around key Collaborative Infrastructure components including IM, IP telephony, presence technologies and workflow.

    Jon¡¦s session will not only educate those new to LCS but also update those already aware of the capabilities of this technology, specifically with regard to the Telephony Integration story and the lessons learnt.

    The session will address the following areas:

  •      Overview of Live Communications Server 2005 and the application of this technology

  •      Presence - an overview of this building block for productivity improvement

  •      Integrating LCS into the lives of information workers - via telephony, desktop applications and workflow

  •      How to create a secure collaborative environment

  •      Lessons learnt in deploying LCS-Telephony Integration

  •      Integration with Tandberg videoconferencing solutions

  •      Browser based Communicator clients

  •      What¡¦s Coming up

    The session will also include a practical demonstration of Microsoft LCS with Cisco CallManager click-to-call integration, Tandberg videoconferencing integration and endpoint control.

    [index]

    Jon Mason

    Bio:

    Jon Mason is currently working as the Editor for the e-Framework, a collaboration involving DEST and JISC (UK) as initial foundation partners. Prior to taking on this role he was an Executive Consultant at education.au limited. Since 2000 he has played a key role in IMS Australia, developing Australian engagement in international e-learning specifications and standards development. He chairs the Standards Australia IT-019-1 Committee and heads the Australian delegation to ISO/IEC JTC1 SC36, IT in Learning, Education and Training and is also an active participant in the IMS Global Learning Consortium and the IEEE LTSC. Jon is also the Associate Editor for the International Journal of Learning Technology. Jon previously worked as an information technology manager at the University of Melbourne.

    [index]

    Kerry Blinco

    Bio:

    Kerry Blinco is an independent consultant and technical adviser to DEST. She is the co-manager of the e-Framework Operations Group and the e-Framework and Standards Manager within the RUBRIC project. She participates in a range of international e-learning technical standards activities with IMS, ISO, NISO, and the IEEE LTSC and collaborative activities with organizations such as the JISC's Centre for Educational Technology Interoperability Standards (CETIS). Kerry's particular focus is on frameworks and architectural models, the intersection between learning and information environments, and identity management. She has been involved in a number of national and international collaborative projects win both e-learning and the information environment, representing a variety of institutions including IMS Australia, Macquarie University, the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee and Griffith University. These projects include the Digital Library Federation Repositories Study for the Andrew W Mellon Foundation,

    [index]

    Update on the e-Framework for Education and Research

    Abstract:

    This presentation will provide an update on activities and recent developments associated with the e-Framework for Education and Research, an international collaboration initiated late in 2005 involving DEST (Australia) and JISC (UK) as foundation partners. The context in which the e-Framework operates is the evolving technical infrastructure that supports the education and research communities. First and foremost, the e-Framework aims to facilitate technical interoperability within and across education and research through improved strategic planning and implementation processes. A key outcome will be the development of an open standards-based, service-oriented technical framework to support the education and research communities. The "e" in the initiative is intended to signify a broad scope in technical infrastructure development, spanning the five key areas within higher education: teaching and learning, administration, information technology services, research, and library services. This infrastructure

    It is recognised that in order to achieve the desired flexibility as well as sustainability of the effort the development of the Framework will be necessarily incremental. Its success or otherwise is very much dependent upon engagement of stakeholders and contributions made by them. New partners have been identified and there are plans to extend community involvement over the next year.

    [index]

    Mike Hicks

    Bio:

    Mike Hicks is currently the Principal Consultant for Advanced Networking at Compuware. With a long career providing support to complex corporate networks throughout, Europe, North America, Asia and Australia, including the Ford Motor Company, Cisco Systems, Singapore Airlines, ANZ Bank, Telstra and the European Space agency, Mike works closely with many infrastructure vendors in the area of Application profiling, and management. Mike is also the author of Managing Distributed Applications: Trouble shooting in a heterogeneous environment (Prentice Hall 2000) and Optimising Applications on Cisco Networks (Cisco Press 2004); as well as several white papers on the subject of Application delivery and optimisation.

    [index]

    Abstract:

    Preparation is the key to deploying and managing converged networks -

    With the exponential growth in the deployment of VoIP across the enterprise; converged communications systems are changing the way businesses communicate, driving improved operational efficiencies, reducing costs and offering a centralised, reliable telephony network that is easier to manage

    An organisations choice to adopt VoIP is often no longer a question of if, but when. Driven by promises of reduced network infrastructure costs and increased productivity through converged applications, many organizations are deploying or evaluating the feasibility of VoIP.

    Since enterprise VoIP deployments first began, there have been a number of great successes, and there has also been a number of high-profile disasters; Dow Chemical, Carnegie Mellon, Merrill Lynch, and others who began wide-scale deployments only to back out or change direction due to quality and acceptance issues. In cases like these, the cost of failed deployment can be millions of dollars.

    Although each case is unique, the general pitfalls incurred in these and ongoing projects have included the underestimation of VoIP by treating it ¡§as just another application on the network¡¨. Frequently telephony-grade voice quality has simply been expected without benchmarking performance through the reliance on a single view ¡¨snapshot¡¨ network assessment and a focus on infrastructure requirements, without any consideration for both voice-related and business critical applications.

    This session will discuss the creation of a final architecture and user migration plan that will align the proposed converged network with your business needs and requirements.

    [index]

    Craig Stevens

    Bio:

    Craig is a Consulting Solutions Architect working for Cisco's Service Provider Wireline business. In this Asia Pacific role he has the opportunity to engage with customers to understand both their business and technical requirements to ensure that the Cisco architectures meet both.

    Craig has been in the communications industry for twenty years starting from the early days of IBM's SNA through the age of the internet to today's era of convergence. Craig's background is in technical support, software development and more recently service architectures. He has held various engineering and leadership positions in companies including Fujitsu, Proteon, Bay Networks, Xylogics and Nortel. Craig has also been a speaker at various international conferences.

    [index]

    Factoring Lower Networking Layers into the GRiD

    Abstract:

    The presentation will provide an overview of GriD technology and GriD architecture including applications for High Performance Computing (HPC).

    Applications pertaining to the medical, enterprise, pharmaceutical industries (and others) are very relevant today and not restricted to research environments. The presenter will describe emerging optical technology upon which GriD applications will operate.

    Note further that the next generation of advanced optical networks will see not only a tighter coupling of the control plane with IP, they also need to satisfy all requirements coming from bandwidth-intensive users and applications, as well as from distributed and computational Grids. Finally, the presentation will cover what it means to factor lower networking layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) into the Grid, with a focus on layer 7.

    [index]

    Nick Bromhead

    Bio:

    Nick has worked in the wireless industry for over 10 years initially in R&D and more recently in product marketing. He has recently been involved in the deployment of Australia's largest wireless broadband network. Nick is now exploring how wireless broadband can be made more widely available with WiMAX technology and the impact on today¡¦s organisations.

    [index]

    Emerging wireless broadband technologies.

    Abstract:

    The presentation will look at emerging wireless broadband technologies (specifically WiMAX) and the changes these are likely to bring to both consumers and enterprises. WiMAX is a new IEEE standard designed to build on the success of WiFi for local networks by creating a high capability technology for wide area networks. It combines the latest in air interface technologies and QoS (quality of service) to deliver the full range of services being envisaged for wired broadband services. New technologies include OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) and MIMO (multiple input multiple output) antenna systems.

    Just as mobile phones changed voice communications from being a shared resource to a personal resource, wireless broadband will also see broadband move from being a shared resource to being a personal resource. To help illustrate the convergence wireless broadband is helping to facilitate, new service models will be investigated. The presentation will cover how this will impact Education. For example, a University may offer its students a full range of telecommunications services through its own campus infrastructure and wholesale services that connect students when away from the campus. Students would be connected via WiMAX when they're off campus and WiFi on campus. They would have access to VoIP for internal and external calls, conference calling for study groups, video feeds of lectures or tutorials.

    [index]

    Paul Brauer

    Bio:

    Paul has over 9 years experience as a network engineer, and has recently joined NetStar as a Solutions Architect having previously been a Senior Solutions Architect at Logicalis / Cerulean Networks (division of IBM).

    Paul has gained an exceptional reputation in the industry as one of the most accomplished and experienced Cisco engineers available. His most recent experience includes the delivery of key IP Communications / Convergence projects for high profile customers including Swinburne University of Technology, Mercy Health & Aged Care, TRU Energy, and Optus.

    Paul has numerous Cisco certifications including CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP and has a specialization in Cisco IPCC Express. Paul is also currently studying for his CCIE Voice certification.

    [index]

    Swinburne - The fully Converged Network

    Abstract:

    In 2005, Swinburne took their network refresh project out to tender. Netstar was the successful tenderer and awarded the refresh. The project not only refreshed the entire Swinburne data network, but brought significant enhancements and new technology into the network.

    Through the project, a true converged network was born. All infrastructure deployed was capable of supporting convergence to its fullest capability. MPLS technology was deployed to secure these new technologies and to provide maximum utilization of bandwidth.

    Being a university of technology, Swinburne has always been at the leading edge. The network refresh continued with that legacy. Existing advanced technologies such as IP Telephony were upgraded with new hardware and to the latest software versions, enabling new features such as Video over IP. The existing voice mail system was replaced with Cisco Unity providing Unified messaging with Novell Groupwise. Faxing and SMS was also integrated with Groupwise extending Unified messaging services.

    The wireless network was redesigned and refreshed, providing better coverage and more intelligence to improve student services and to extend telephony functionality. Moving forward from the refresh, video conferencing is now being redefined. Utilizing the existing video conferencing infrastructure and the upgraded telephony environment, voice and video will be seamlessly integrated. This will result in improved teaching services to remote campuses such as Malaysia and reduced travel costs for teaching staff.

    [index]

    Richard Constantine

    Bio:

    Richard Constantine has over 18 years experience in the IT Industry and is currently the Chief Information Officer and Director of Information Technology Services at Swinburne University of Technology. He has extensive experience in education within the tertiary and TAFE sectors as well as in Industry as an IT Consultant and many years ago as a pre/post sales engineer.

    His responsibilities include IT Strategy, Communications Technology Infrastructure, Applications and major IT projects for the University's operations across all of Swinburne's campuses.

    Richard's qualifications include a post graduate diploma in Management Studies from Melbourne Business School, The University of Melbourne and a Masters of Business Administration from Monash University in which he took a keen interest in Technology Management.

    Richard is also the Chairperson of the board of Infoxchange - a not for profit, social justice organisation working to bring the benefits of technology to all, using multiple strategies to address societies' so called 'digital divide'.

    [index]

    Paul Ducklin

    Bio:

    Paul Ducklin is Head of Technology, Asia Pacific at Sophos. He joined Sophos from the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in 1995. He has held a variety of roles within Sophos, including running software development in the UK office, and heading up Sophos' global technical support operations.

    One of the world's leading virus experts, Paul has given papers and presentations at many industry events including conferences such as Virus Bulletin, AVAR and AusCERT. He is an experienced and entertaining presenter, and a respected industry spokesperson.

    [index]

    Enabling New Technologies Without Disabling Your Network

    Abstract:

    You can't do much on the internet these days, especially in a collaborative research environment, without embracing the use of decentralised technologies for information sharing. (This is a fancy way of saying "peer-to-peer systems".)

    Being able to publish and share information quickly and without bureaucracy is important, but it is also risky -- because once in place, the technologies to do this are often easily subverted and exploited by criminal elements.

    Managing the risks without getting in the way of progress is a tricky balancing act. This paper looks at ways of doing so, in particular how to:

    o    Centrally enable, administer and support software which itself strongly supports decentralisation;

    o    Identify and deal with some common security and privacy problems which can arise from the unregulated use of such software;

    o    Manage the almost inevitable complaints about "bureaucratic interference" arising from (1) and (2) above.

    [index]

    Phil Edholm

    Bio:

    Phil Edholm is the Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Strategy and Architecture for Nortel¡¦s Enterprise Solutions and Packet Networks group. Leveraging his experience as a technology leader across Nortel enterprise line of data and voice networking products, Phil focuses on the Nortel Enterprise Portfolio and packet and optical solutions for Service Providers. In this role, he is responsible for defining the vision and architecture in the enterprise and next generation packet/optical networks. He also is responsible for portfolio architecture, strategy, and advanced network engineering. In this role he and his team drive the technologies and architectures across the ESPN portfolio that delivers systems value and capability.

    At Nortel, Phil has led the development of VoIP solutions and multimedia communications as well as IP transport technology. Phil¡¦s background includes extensive LAN and data communications experience, including 9 years with Sytek/Hughes LAN Systems and 4 years with Silicon Valley start-ups. Phil was a member of the IEEE 802.3 standards committee during the definition of broadband Ethernet and 10BaseT, developed the first multi-protocol network interfaces, and was a founder of the Frame Relay Forum. He has been a featured speaker at many international conferences and is recognized as an industry visionary and leader of the convergence transformation. Phil has been in the VoiceCon Great Debate three times. Phil has been recognized by the IEEE as the originator of ¡§Edholm¡¦s Law of Bandwidth¡¨ as published in July 2003 IEEE Spectrum magazine. Phil has 7 patents with 18 patent applications pending. He holds a BSME/EE from GMI/Kettering University.

    [index]

    Networking Discontinuities - Opportunities and Challenges

    Abstract:

    Network Convergence is leading to disruptive technologies around Virtualisation, Hyper-interactivity, Webification and Omni-Networking. These new technologies, products, and solutions will not only offer organisations key opportunities to create strategic advantage and new services, but they introduce new challenges as well. Implementing these solutions requires new thinking and is transforming the relationships between organisations, their vendor partners and the channels that integrate solutions. In this session, Phil Edholm, CTO and Vice President Architecture and Strategy will discuss Nortel's vision of the coming communications world and the way technologies will come together to transform the way we work and interact. Phil will discuss how these technologies can enable new ways for your organisation to provide services to both students and staff. In addition, he will outline some of the challenges that will emerge and how Nortel is working in the standards community to make the systems of the future work in multi vendor environments, across organisational and service provider boundaries.

    [index]

    Robert Dolphin

    Bio:

    Rob Dolphin has worked in the telecommunications industry since 1981 and has been with Nortel since 1989. Rob¡¦s experience spans both the carrier and enterprise business. Rob has had extensive experience in the design and deployment of a number of data and voice networks across the region, as well as working with a number of large corporations on the deployment of their converged IP networks. Recently Rob has been appointed the role of Senior Architect for Asia Pacific to help drive Converged, Collaboration solutions across the region.

    [index]

    Enabling Secure Realtime Media with SIP

    Abstract:

    Tertiary Education institutions are increasingly looking toward modern communications tools to enhance both the academic and business sides of their operations. Increased communications using many types of real time media between students, lecturers and staff both within and between institutions are enabling a better student experience and learning environment. By leveraging existing IP network infrastructures and embracing open standards such as SIP, any to any collaboration can be achieved between interested parties. As this kind of open communication becomes more prolific there is an increasing concern over privacy and potential interception by third parties.

    To mitigate the risks of such interception organisations are looking to encryption technologies to provide privacy. Secure Real Time Protocol (SRTP) provides a well tested and standards based method of achieving this encryption. The difficulty in implementing SRTP in a scalable and flexible fashion is the mechanism by which encryption keys are exchanged between the communicating endpoints.

    As SIP is emerging as the protocol of choice for negotiating media sessions there is a lot of work being carried out in the IETF to determine what methods of key exchange should be adopted for standardisation.

    A number of protocols exist or are under development such as SDESCRIPTIONS, MIKEY/KMGMT, ZRTP, EKT and RTP/DTLS. Each of these methods has different tradeoffs relating to their level of security, relative complexity and handling of scenarios such as call forking and early media.

    This presentation will provide an overview of these methods and discuss the pros and cons of each.

    [index]

    Dr. Rodney G. McDuff

    Bio:

    Rodney McDuff is currently the Manager of the Strategic Technologies Group with the Information Technology Services at The University of Queensland. Whilst at ITS Rodney has also been responsible for the planning, implementation and maintenance of core IT infrastructure services, applications and systems at UQ. He has also previously worked as a Research Fellow at the Advanced Computation Modelling Centre.

    [index]

    SIP ain't SIMPLE

    Abstract:

    The University of Queensland has undertaken a feasibility study to determine how we can construct an open flexible scalable multi-modal communications solution to supplement our current PSTN telephony system using common freely available components as well as various commercial products. Such a communications solution based on SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) holds the promise to provide a platform that will surpass our current telephony technology and revolutionize the work place and the campus community through an integrated collaboration infrastructure based on video, instant messaging and presence enabled services. However there are still many challenges dealing with interoperability, quality of service, high availability and security that cloud this promise. This talk discusses how The University of Queensland has met these challenges.

    [index]

    Rod Swile

    Bio:

    Rod Swile has been employed in the IT industry for 17 years with 11 years at the Queensland University of Technology. He has had had a diverse set of experience in areas such as desktop management, systems management and systems development. Have undertaken several projects in the areas such as business systems analysis and automation for a large manufacturing company and most recently, in the re-development of DNS at QUT.

    QUT IPAMS Upgrade Project 2003: From Delegation to Deployment.

    [index]

    Abstract:

    DNS and IPAMS (IP address management systems) tend to fly below the radar for CIO's and senior managers at QUT. There is no visible benefit to our major clients, in our case the student, so why bother? There is a whole new world of services gaining critical mass and creating new challenges for IT professionals such as wireless, VPN gateways, Eduroam, etc..

    For us at QUT the answer was in fact in the question, "Why Bother". Why bother in developing a 100% fit solution when you can get off the shelf 90% fit.

    In this presentation we will explore the rational behind QUT' refocus of DNS and IPAMS and how we came to the solution we did. It will explore some key but often overlooked issue regarding DNS such as managing the deployment and note the new challenges in managing the system vertically.

    [index]

    Bruce Williams

    Bio:

    Bruce Williams, Principal Network Engineer, Griffith University

    Bruce Williams is the Principal Network Engineer at Griffith University. He is responsible for the day to day operation of the Griffith University network as well as steering technical development and enhancements.

    He graduated from QUT with a Bachelor of Information Technology in 1995. Began work at Griffith University in 1996 in client service dealing with modems and remote access. Continued working at Griffith as a Network Support Officer and eventually Network Engineer. In 1998, codeveloped the "Snapper" student network quota-ing system, but later continued to support and enhance the product individually. In 2001/2002 was instrumental in developing Griffith's new "NetCheck" Internet accounting system by adapting the Cisco SSG feature to a LAN network model.

    [index]

    Sudath Wijeratne

    Bio:

    Sudath Wijeratne, Manager of the Infrastructure Continuity and Architectural Services Group, ICTS, Griffith University

    Sudath Wijeratne is currently the Manager of the Infrastructure Continuity and Architectural Services (ICAS) Group in Information and Communication Technology Services Division (ICTS) at Griffith University.

    He is responsible for implementing sound Corporate Technology Architecture practices, implementation of key ITIL service delivery components such as Availability, Continuity and Capacity Management and management of all corporate Data Centres.

    He is also currently Project Managing the Disaster Recovery Project as part of responsibility for ITIL Continuity management process implementation.

    Sudath held a number of positions over a decade of his career at Griffith University in Corporate Technology Infrastructure and Corporate Information Systems sections. He played a key role in implementation of PeopleSoft Enterprise Resource planning Systems at the University. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Computer Systems and Networks at St Petersburg electronic University, Russia.

    [index]

    Virtual Server Campus Network Design and Disaster Recovery

    Abstract:

    Griffith University is implemented a Virtual campus network between its Major campuses (Nathan and Gold Coast) and are currently in the process of implementing Disaster Recovery for our Learning Management system (Black Board. This presentation will talk about Virtual Server Campus implementation and the utilisation of this network for implementation of DR.

    [index]

    Dr. Tracey Wilen-Daugenti

    Bio:

    Dr. Tracey Wilen-Daugenti is the Managing Director of the Internet Business Solutions team at Cisco Systems Inc. In her current role she leads Higher Education institutions in innovation and excellence by using the Internet to achieve institutional goals. Before joining the Internet Business Solutions Group, Tracey held a number of positions at Cisco for the past eleven years in the areas of Business Development, Marketing, and Operations. Prior to Cisco, Tracey held executive positions at Hewlett Packard and Apple Computer.

    Tracey holds an MBA and Doctorate in International Business and is currently a visiting scholar at Stanford University. She has been an adjunct professor for graduate and doctoral programs for a number of Bay Area universities for the past 15 years. Her areas of expertise are International Business, Leadership, and Women Studies. Tracey was recently named San Francisco Women of the year, by the Women in Business Organization in San Francisco, for her outreach in the field of academia, women¡¦s research, and technology.

    Tracey was recognized in 1995 as a notable forthcoming modern academic researcher on women in International Business. She has authored to date six (6) books which include: Mexico for Women in Business, International Business: A Basic Guide for Women, Europe for Women in Business, and co-authored Asia for Woman in Business, Doing Business with Western women: A guide for Japanese men and Doing Business with Japanese Men which made the LA time best new notable non-fiction business book. In addition, she has published numerous articles, chapters, and essays regarding international business. Addressing the topic of Women, Leadership, and International business, she is a frequent guest on national television and radio (CNN, FNN, ABC, NBC, and CBS), interviewed in news columns: LA Times, Chicago Tribune, Atlanta Business Journal and a speaker for key Universities (Stanford, UCLA, Berkeley, and NYU) and business groups (WITI, NAWBO, and AMA) Her website is www.globalwomen.biz.

    [index]

    The 21st Century University

    Abstract:

    Higher Education is in transition due to changes in shifts in demographics, globalization, pervasive technology, the technology savvy student, and global competition. In addition, Universities are undergoing reforms in countries due to continued budget pressures. At the same time Universities need to keep their focus on the future and developing a competitive workforce.

    The 21st Century University will cover these trends and what some higher education institutions are doing to address the future. Examples will cover both the physical and virtual campus, continual innovation, and how Universities are planning to remain competitive. Topics covered will include both strategies and actual implementations of what is taking place on global campuses. Key examples will highlight how various institutions use technology to enhance services and meet the needs of the new incoming students.

    [index]

    Viviani Paz

    Bio:

    Viviani Paz is the Security Assurance Manager for AusCERT (The Australian Computer Emergency Response Team) based at The University of Queensland. Prior to joining AusCERT in 1997, Viviani worked in a range of IT areas including: system and network security; project management, system programming and administration; and software testing in the Commercial and Academic sectors.

    The Australian Computer Emergency Response Team (AusCERT) provides a single, trusted point of contact in Australia for the Internet community to deal with computer security incidents and their prevention.

    [index]

    The Australian Higher Education and Research sectors Certification Authority

    Federation

    Abstract:

    The Australian Higher Education and Research sectors Certification Authority Federation project is part of a larger effort from Australian Higher Education Sector with support from AusCERT, CAUDIT, the University of Queensland, the Department of Education, Science and Training and other universities to develop an environment in which Universities can collaborate and interoperate with each other at low cost and low risk.

    This project builds on previous CAUDIT PKI and MAMS projects to establish a production Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for the University and Research Sector, based on the standards developed in the previous project, and to develop a pilot federation which leverages the PKI infrastructure in aligning the trust arrangements between institutions to support the implementation of Shibboleth across the sector. It also seeks to lower the barriers of entry to PKI using open source software. The project outcomes would be to enable the secure sharing of resources and research infrastructure across the domestic sector and with international partners.

    The aim of this project is to develop and ultimately implement a PKI for CAUDIT universities (which include universities in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Papua New Guinea) and the CAUDIT research community. To achieve this goal the project team is working closely with other projects such as Meta Access Management System Project (MAMS) and Middleware Action Plan and Strategy (MAPS). A phased approach is being used in order to test interoperability and find out issues regarding PKI enabled applications prior to production implementation.

    This project has four central objectives as detailed below:

    Putting PKI into Production

    A project to build upon the existing Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) standards project and move PKI into production for the Higher Education and Research Sector. While the CAUDIT PKI project was making significant progress in this field, its funding was only to develop standards and some trial implementations.

    Establishing PKI/Shibboleth alignment

    A project to build upon the existing PKI and MAMS projects and the Production PKI project identified earlier to develop models and pilot implementations of a common trust federation which would support both PKI and Shibboleth and therefore support a common approach to authentication and authorisation across the sector. This includes the development of a unified model for federation and trust which aligns PKI and Shibboleth approaches, including pilot demonstrations. This unified model, once complete, could form the basis for a future production Federation service across the Higher Education and Research Sector, aligned with the production PKI service outlined above.

    Reducing the Systems Cost barriers to entry for PKI

    This project aims to reduce the barriers for entry to PKI for all universities and research institutions by providing cost effective access to a free or low cost Certificate Management System for the sector (including access to the source code). This will require the development of training, documentation and a support mechanism.

    Integrating Grid technologies with PKI/Shibboleth

    This project will investigate the requirements and develop appropriate technologies to allow the APAC Grid infrastructure to become properly Shibboleth aware. It will provide opportunities for research activities in high-performance computing and large-scale data initiatives to test the functionality and scalability of the Shibboleth authentication architecture and associated authorisation architectures being developed by groups such as PERMIS. It will work directly with the NMI "Grid-Shib" initiative as appropriate.

    In this session we will describe the trust fabric and trust model used to implement this Federation and we will provide an update on its progress.

    [index]

    John Zornig

    Bio:

    John has as a science and technology research background. He gained a B.Sc. from the University of Queensland, majoring in Mathematics and Computer Science, where he was employed as a tutor, research assistant, systems programmer and systems administrator. Over the following 25 years John worked as a Specialist Systems Engineer for Sun, Pyramid Technology, Network Solutions, Convex Supercomputer, Fujitsu including 10 years at Apple, Recently he has worked as an independent technology consultant and in January he returned to the University of Queensland as a Specialist Systems Analyst in the Strategic Technology Group within ITS. John is working on projects involving middleware, PKI, federated authentication and grid computing. John is also studying for his B.Sc. Honours.

    [index]

    Stephen Kingham

    Bio:

    Since 1998, Stephen has been the architect and manager for the VoIP and VIDEOoverIP network used by CSIRO and the Australian Universities. During this time he has lead the introduction of VoIP, IP Telephony, VIDEO over IP and SIP based services.

    As part of designing CSIRO's and the Australian Universities' National VoIP Network Stephen invented, designed and wrote an "active QoS Admission control" distributed application, to guarantee that telephone calls would only be routed over VoIP if the quality was the same as any telephone network. Called "VoIPMonitor".

    Stephen has Project Management training and skills proven during the CSIRO/AARNet VoIP and VIDEO Projects, as well as replacement of Centerlink's telephone services comprising 2,000 Call Center Agents and 30,000 office telephones.

    Stephen has been in the Telecommunications industry since 1980 and has several tertiary qualifications.

    Stephen is also active in National and International forums. He is the Chair of the Asia Pacific Advanced Networks Working Group on SIP and H.323. He is a member of the Numerical Addressing Space Management Team for the Global Dialing Scheme that links the worlds H.323 networks together using three International Root H.323 Gatekeepers, one of which is managed by Stephen. Stephen is active in Australia's ENUM trial and AARNet's Working Groups on IPTEL and VIDEO. He is also active on several international groups in Terena and Internet2

    [index]

    H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging

    Abstract:

    Over the past 6 years in Australia and overseas, the R&E sector has built up peering VoIP and VIDEO over IP networks using an international hierarchy of H.323 Gatekeepers. With the advent of SIP based VoIP, VIDEOoverIP, Presence and Instant Messaging, peering technologies like ENUM, and the adoption of SIP by Carriers, there is a large amount of discussion occurring in the area of how to peer Real Time based communications into the future.

    This presentation will present what AARNet might do to facilitate peering Real Time Communications in the R&E (H.323 and SIP), sector including views from overseas, and how Universities/CSIRO would peer. This presentation is based on a paper by a small group of the AARNet IPTEL Working Group.

    [index]

    Peter Hole

    Bio:

    To be provided.

    [index]

    The Great Paradox - Cost-effective Security in a Permissive and Distributed Environment

    Abstract:

    With 7000 staff and 30,000 students, Macquarie University (MQ) faces increased threats from unauthorised access, virus and worms, and malicious attacks against its assets & systems. Any attacks launched from within its network to external global organisations have an equally detrimental impact on Macquarie University and so must also be contained.

    MQ's potential security model is complicated by the need to provide generally "open and liberal" access to many resources within the University and on the Internet, while supporting highly variable requirements to secure information and systems within the University across various School IT Departments and central IT Services Department (ITS).

    The requirement to enhance security posture within a largely permissive environment while managing the cost pressure of a large, distributed networking environment creates a true paradox.

    A Layered Security Architecture within a Flexible Security Framework
    Through an extensive consultative and trial process MQ opted for layered security architecture. By collapsing MQ's L3 backbone into a "Security Control Core" the majority of MQ's internal traffic and all external traffic can be directed through a centralised, extremely high performance, and highly resilient security infrastructure incorporating firewalls, traffic management and QoS enforcement points, as well as providing advanced session monitoring, analysis, and remediation. The development of an MQ Security Framework as outline in Diagram 1 allows for simplicity and ease of management, combined with a very high performance backbone infrastructure. It provides ITS with the ability to apply rigorous security policy to a large proportion of all traffic within the MQ systems.

    While the framework provides MQ with the ability to minimise costs, extend security policy and enforcement far beyond the normal reach of ITS is attractive, nothing in the proposed solution prevents MQ from using any of the technologies in a more distributed fashion around the MQ campus networks. In fact, specific high-risk areas such as the University library are locations for additional surveillance and enforcement points

    [index]

    Andrew Alexander

    Bio:

    With over 20 years experience in the ICT Industry, Andrew Alexander spent 8 of those as the Managing Director of Software Development and component assembly company Ram Computers, 6 as Director of Computer Guru (SMB Services Company) and the last 6 as a solutions consultant where he has specialised in business improvements, technology management and knowledge management.

    [index]

    Ian Atkinson

    Bio:

    Ian Atkinson has a background in computational chemistry that led him to the world of Supercomputing. More recently he has been engaged in the APAC Grid program providing portal and grid computing services to the national research community. He has a long-standing interest in e-Research methods and applications including shared visualisation via AccessGrid and in particular grid mediated access to data sources. He is a CI on the DEST DART e-Research project focussing on data collection from instruments and sensors.

    He holds joint appointments as the Manager of High Performance Computing within Information Technology and Resources at JCU and also a facility member of the School of IT at JCU. He is also the Deputy-CEO of QPSF.

    [index]

    Communication as the facilitator for Knowledge Management and driver for competitive advantage

    Abstract:

    Clearly technology improvements offer us increasing options for collaboration and communication. The focus of research communities is in part moving away from traditional information collection and management and moving towards Knowledge Management or how we facilitate the interaction of people in order to deliver the exchange of relevant information.

    Recently multi-million dollar Health projects have been cancelled at both state and federal levels because the projects failed to deliver on their primary objectives. One could argue these systems tried to do too much. Others will argue that the real value of knowledge is only realised when it is used, and therefore projects that focus on storage alone is doomed to failure because they have not facilitated the use of the imbedded knowledge.

    If knowledge facilitation is required, how do we provide this facilitation, what are the focus areas for developing organisational capability and how can we improve the chances of success in future projects of this type? We will examine some European project examples, look at recent research and demonstrate some possible enablers.

    [index]

    Andrew Alexander

    Bio:

    With 20 years experience in the ICT Industry, Andrew Alexander spent 8 of those as the Managing Director of Software Development and component assembly company Ram Computers, 6 as Director of Computer Guru (SMB Services Company) and the last 6 as a solutions consultant where he has specialised in business improvements, technology management and knowledge management. Andrew is currently engaged in Enterprise Solutions delivery at Commander Australia and was the Commander Project Director for the JCU Network Infrastructure Project.

    [index]

    Carl Van Wyk

    Bio:

    Carl has over 20 years data communications experience across the energy, airline, defence and University environments and has worked in South Africa, the UK as well as Australia. He is the current Communications Infrastructure Manager in charge of Data and Voice systems at James Cook University and had primary responsibility for the project.

    [index]

    Building a Convergent Network - a report on the NORTEL Network Infrastructure implementation project at JCU

    Abstract:

    The replacement of the existing network at James Cook University with the new Nortel Networks Multi-10gig network infrastructure presented a number of issues to JCU and Commander in implementing the solution. Not the least of these was the issue that this technology had not been implemented anywhere else in the world. In this presentation JCU will provide an understanding of the drivers for changing the network, the decision process for choosing this solution over various others and whether this decision has been justified.

    Commander will review the network design, project implementation and issues faced in delivering the Nortel solution, in particular we will cover the lessons learned, outcomes achieved and informal activities which assisted in the overall project success.

    [index]

    Professor Ashley D. Lloyd

    Bio:

    Professor Ashley D. Lloyd, SingTel Optus Chair of Electronic Business, Curtin Business School

    Ashley Lloyd holds the SingTel Optus Chair of Electronic Business at Curtin Business School and also leads research in this area at The University of Edinburgh's Management School. He has researched widely in the general technology arena, from basic research into microscopic phenomena to novel applications of these phenomena in innovative devices for computing, telecommunications and display applications, with publications in journals ranging from the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics to the International Journal of Innovation Management. He holds higher degrees in Physics and Business and has participated in a large number of interdisciplinary research programmes, with funding from research councils and government agencies in the EU, UK, USA and Australia.

    Current projects include a UK Economic and Social Research Council-funded project that links grid resources in Western Australia to those at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre, enabling Grid data fusion and mining of large corporate data samples from both regions and construction of models that accurately predict individual and group behaviour.

    In 2005, with the support of Sun Microsystems and the Office of Science and Innovation in Western Australia, this Grid was extended to include the Computer Network Information Centre of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The potential impact of such grid infrastructure and capabilities on innovation processes within existing industry clusters will be a key factor in the growth and competitiveness of new 'virtual' clusters and is currently being explored with support from the Australian Research Council. These projects can all be described as exploring the diffusion of technology and how it shapes, as well as is shaped by, practice. This interest is reflected in Professor Lloyd's membership of the advisory board for the UK Learning and Teaching Support Network, the board of the International Society for Productivity Enhancement (ISPE), the advisory board of SXTransPORT - the Southern Cross Trans-Pacific Optical Research Testbed, and the International Subcommittee of ARENAC, the Australian Research and Education Network Advisory Committee.

    [index]

    Extending an innovator's 'reach': The Grid and (one) international eSocial Science collaboration

    Abstract:

    In the last decade of networking computers in ways that are recognisable as Grids today, the interoperation of heterogeneous systems over any distance has been a significant challenge. Grids are now entering their third generation. This era of standardisation is predicted to make interoperation so easy that the Global Grid will become more like a market in which there is real competition between solution providers, and hence more innovation possible at the application level.

    For users of this third generation infrastructure, the focus of innovation moves from enhancements in technical capability associated with globally distributed computing to their relationship with 'innovation capacity' - i.e. the ability to expand potential for innovation and extend an innovator's reach

    New forms of collaborating and regional engagement are implicit in the above statement. However, forming new research communities and networks within a sparse, globally distributed, Social Science community is at odds with recorded histories of innovation capacity development at an industry or national level. If forced, this might even increase the volume of communications to the detriment of improved diffusion of ideas.

    Just as the third generation of Grids requires common interfaces to enable interoperation across functional, institutional and national boundaries, so too does the OECD's third generation of National Innovation Policies. Here such interfaces enable the coordination and integration that will "release the potential for innovation that is embedded in other sectors".

    This convergence in thinking appears encouraging as it offers a broader base on which to value investments in Grid infrastructure, and hence a more coherent way of coupling the needs of science, enterprise and society. However, questions remain about whether this convergence will deliver the infrastructure required by Social Scientists to benefit from the tools of eScience, i.e.:

    Is Utility Computing (4thGen Grid?) going to provide eSocial Scientists tomorrow, with the benefits eScientists enjoy today?

    The presentation explores this question drawing on the experiences of having established a 'grid collaboratory' for eSocial Science between Curtin Business School and Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre, Scotland in 2003. This was extended to include the Computer Network and Information Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2005, and continues to develop in the light of opportunities offered by infrastructures such as TEIN2.

    [index]

    Guido Aben

    Bio:

    Guido Aben is responsible for building the AEDN concept. Prior to joining AARNet, Guido worked for SURFnet, the Dutch NREN sister organisation to AARNet. He held a similar business development role responsible for projects as diverse as rolling out SURFnet's dark fibre footprint, specifying and tendering for a flat-fee x.509 service (this in the wider scope of TERENA) and deploying an Internet voting system accepting legally valid votes during an actual election for a national government structure. Guido holds an MSc in Physics from Utrecht University.

    [index]

    AEDN, a Network of Networks

    Abstract:

    AARNet has been working in partnership with DEST to trial AEDN, an Australian Education Digital Network concept. This concept will extend AARNet's network connectivity to a wider education audience including TAFE and k-12 communities. This presentation will present the background to AEDN and details of how AEDN will be implemented via an AARNet interconnect and aggregated educational networks. In addition to the network, AARNet are also actively involved in teaching and learning applications and services that can take advantage of these new network connections.

    [index]

    Anthony Cross

    Bio:

    Anthony cross is a network design engineer within the NSW department of Education and Training's Networks team. He has been involved in projects such as a state wide rollout of broadband to the Departments' 2500 managed sites, Video conference design and deployment and more recently the interconnection of NSW DET to AARNET.

    His interests include watching people windsurf and NOT fixing computers belonging to family and friends.

    [index]

    Chris Richter

    Bio:

    Chris Richter has extensive experience in web development, specialising in interactive web applications. Chris manages a web development company in Northern NSW developing online training products for TAFE NSW, Local Government, Health Services and many other local and interstate organisation. Chris has also been instrumental in developing web conferencing and live interactive tools using Flash Communication Server for New England TAFE. Chris has many years experience in Web Applications development using SQL, ASP, ASP.NET, C#, Flash Remoting, Actionscript, XML and other web related languages.

    [index]

    Rod Badger

    Bio:

    Dr Rod Badger has been Deputy Secretary, Information Economy in the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts since April 2004. He is responsible for providing policy and strategic advice on the development and application of Australia¡¦s capability in information and communications technology and the development of Australia as an information economy.

    Dr Badger originally joined the Department in 1994. He has held a number of senior positions covering responsibilities in telecommunications, broadcasting, information and communications technology and intellectual property. Prior to 1994 Dr Badger held a range of senior policy and program administration positions in the Industry Department. He chaired the National Electronic Authentication Council in 2000 to 2001. He is a member of the CSIRO¡¦s Information, Communication and Services Sector Advisory Council.

    [index]

    ICT enabling e-Research and Online Collaboration

    Abstract:

    DCITA research shows that ICT has underpinned Australian productivity growth over the last two decades. ICT is radically improving our capacity to collect, analyse, utilise, distribute and exchange information. ICT systems are embedded across the economy, in traditional areas of activity such as mining and agriculture, in the financial and insurance sector, in government service delivery, and increasingly in the health and education sectors. It is enabling the emergence of new flexible working relationships, flatter organisational structures, networked organisations, virtual organisations, and new business models. It is also improving our capacity for research and innovation and creating a virtuous circle of sustained innovation. It is empowering consumers and citizens by giving them more diverse sources of information and knowledge than ever before.

    e-Research is the term that the Australian Government is using to describe the transforming impact of ICT on the research realm. While the term is sometimes used interchangeably with "e-science", "e-research" has a broad application across research disciplines. It reflects an evolving new capacity for large-scale, distributed, global collaboration in research, providing a new level of scope, scale and detail. While e-research is relatively new as a structured concept, it is starting to underpin all research disciplines including the humanities and social sciences. It is also emerging as a significant element in advancing the Information Economy more broadly because of the strong relationship between e-research and e-transformation across the economy.

    [index]

    Mark Barnett

    Bio:

    Mark has been with ATI Australia for some 12 years starting as a trainee engineer in 1994 when he began study for a Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical Engineering) at the University of New South Wales.

    In 1998, Mark conducted research and implemented a field trial of automated electric meter reading using Power Line Carrier and a 900MHz multipoint radio. This work was carried out as a thesis project in partnership with Itron Australasia and Energy Australia.

    Since completion of undergraduate studies in 1998, Mark has worked as an Engineer and project manager at ATI Australia and has been pivotal in the design and rollout of many point to point and point to multipoint radio networks including numerous long haul microwave networks for Australian Universities.

    Mark is an ACMA accredited person actively involved in the coordination and licensing of spectrum and apparatus licensed wireless systems. He also provides consulting services to a wide range of wireless network operators on class licensed and licensed radio systems.

    [index]

    Planning and Deploying Broadband Wireless - A WiMax case study

    Abstract:

    A discussion of the process involved and tools utilized to take a WiMax deployment from concept to commissioning. Includes:

  • an introduction to wireless product specifications,
  • ACMA licencing constraints and achievable outcomes,
  • how to realistically interpret specifications into achievable system performance expectations,
  • coverage prediction tools,
  • geographic optimization,
  • deployment and support in regional areas.

    [index]

    Paul Davis

    Bio:

    Paul Davis has been the Director of GrangeNet since August 2002. Prior to joining GrangeNet he was the CTO of ac3 (the Australian Centre for Advanced Computing and Communications) and responsible for the development of one of Australia's foremost high performance computing centres. Paul spent 25 years in scientific based computation the last twelve years of which involved supercomputing. He has been Head of IT with the Biomolecular Research Institute where he built and managed several supercomputing facilities and IT Manager at CSIRO Division of Molecular Science. He was one of CSIRO's most senior, divisional IT managers and IT policy makers.

    [index]

    What you can do in five years with a few million dollars

    Abstract:

    For four years GrangeNet has provided the Australian research community with access to a gigabit optical network. This enabling technology was tuned for collaborative working and to support key projects in grid and eResearch technologies. This has been an incredible journey. This presentation will retrace the steps illustrating some of the activities and projects undertaken along the way and the impact that they have had on Australian research.

    GrangeNet has never lost sight of the fact that its role was to help you - the ICT professionals - deliver the best services you could to the research communities you support. And the effect that access to GrangeNet has had on research is a tribute to your skills as much as it is to GrangeNet's. On the journey through the GrangeNet's experience we will digress to take a closer look at some of the applications and illustrate GrangeNet's willingness to engage and focus on customer service.

    GrangeNet was designed as a five-year advanced network program and, at the end of 2006, the network will be shutdown and the projects wound up. Many of you will want to hear, first hand, about GrangeNet's sunset plans.

    [index]

    Peter Bahas

    Bio:

    Peter Bahas - Senior Network Systems Engineer, University of Technology, Sydney. Peter Bahas has been employed in the IT industry for 20 years with 4 years at the University of Technology, Sydney. He has extensive knowledge and experience in the design, development and management of IT, network and security systems for corporate, government and ISP sectors. In his current capacity at the University of Technology, Sydney, Peter has worked on over 100 projects, including the complete redesign of the University network.

    [index]

    e-nabling eResearch through next generation networks

    Abstract:

    The University of Technology, Sydney implemented the World's 1st MAC OS10 Distributed Animation LAB Facility within the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building.

    This presentation will describe:

  • Animation application background and uses
  • Network challenges faced in development of a Distributed Animation LAB Facility
  • The network solution outlined
  • How the challenges were met by the solution
  • Benefits of the Distributed Animation LAB Facility

    [index]

    Shane Moore

    Bio:

    Shane Moore joined EMC Corporation in 2000 as a Senior Systems Engineer before moving to the position of Product Marketing Manager in 2005. In this role, Shane is responsible for EMC's specialist product marketing activities and he plays a strategic role in advising on the go-to-market strategy of EMC's products and solutions.

    Shane has over 15 years experience in the IT industry. Having commenced his career as an Officer in the R.A.A.F, Shane subsequently held a variety of senior IT positions in the Commonwealth Department of Treasury and Tyndall (a Promina Group company). Prior to joining EMC, Shane was a Senior Consultant at Computer Associates International.

    Shane holds a Masters degree in Business Administration as well as a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a Graduate Diploma in Applied Computing.

    [index]

    Managing Grid Computing

    Abstract:

    "Grid Computing", "Grid Architectures" and "Storage Grids," are terms widely used to describe distributed computing architectures. Grids are usually complex, span multiple data centres and address massive quantities of data. Because there are many different applications that may leverage grid computing in the future, customers will require a complete family of storage platforms that offers a range of different storage technology options. These will include Fibre Channel, iSCSI, high-end clustered NAS, advanced file system technology, as well as partnerships among technology leaders.

    This session will describe how you can add intelligence to the grid environment in order to help administrators track down the root cause of problems, from the application layer, right through to the storage network infrastructure.

    [index]

    Stephen Walsh

    Bio:

    Stephen joined the ITCS Client Services team at ACU in 2001 following a period of work at a commercial ISP and a large metropolitan newspaper. Stephen was a part of ACU's eduroam implementation team in December 2005 as a Linux Specialist, and worked closely with AARNet's Chris Myers on a number of issues, including the rewrite of freeRADIUS's certificate generation script and the Windows Server 2003 Heuristic search bug. Stephen enjoys spending his spare time with his wife Erin, and trying to program his VCR.

    [index]

    eduroam wireless implementation - lessons learned

    Abstract:

    The intention of this presentation is to look at the actual implementation of eduroam at ACU, including the initial testing, proof of concept for single-server/multi-campus, portability and disaster recovery planning and testing, resultant network upgrades and reconfigurations and the like. Stephen will cover the roll of the certificate process in the connection negotiation, and what prompted the rewrite of the certificate generation script that comes with FreeRADIUS. He will also look at what benefits eduroam has provided ACU, as well as other initiatives and upgrades eduroam has prompted, and will also be covering what ACU's implementation has given back to the FreeRADIUS project, as well as eduroam implementations at other Universities. This presentation is intended to provide information for institutions looking to implement eduroam themselves, or for institutions who have recently implemented eduroam.

    [index]

    Chris Disspain

    Bio:

    Chris Disspain was appointed CEO of auDA in October 2000. auDA is the self regulatory body governing the .au domain name space and managing the domain name system in Australia.

    For 14 years Chris was a corporate lawyer in the U.K. and Australia. For over ten years he has held executive management positions and directorships in private and public companies in the U.K. and Australia.

    Chris is the Chair of the Country Code Name Supporting Organisation, a body that represents the interests of and sets global policy and best practice for country code top level domains within ICANN. He is also a Director of the Asia Pacific Top Level Domain organisation which represents country codes in the Asia Pacific region.

    [index]

    Internet Governance - A national and international challenge

    Abstract:

    auDA is the Australian domain name administrator. ICANN is auDA's international equivalent. Both are non-government organisations intimately involved in managing critical aspects of the internet's infrastructure.

    The internet works so why should Internet Governance be a challenge? Because no-one is entirely sure what Internet Governance does or should cover and there are many issues where, currently, no-one is in overall charge. The digital divide, spam, cyber-crime and the free flow of and access to information are just some of the areas that Internet Governance may include.

    The push is on for more regulation not less. Threats include a takeover of the technical infrastructure by International Government Organisations and the fragmenting of the system as some countries consider setting up their own internet 'alternative'.

    This presentation by auDA CEO, Chris Disspain, will cover the present, the future and how you can make sure that your voice is heard.

    [index]

    Kevin Dillon

    Bio:

    Kevin Dillon, Senior Director, Strategic Development, Juniper Networks, also CTO and IPsphere Forum Board Chair

    Kevin Dillon is Senior Director of Strategic Development for Juniper Networks, recently relocated from California back to Australia.

    Before Juniper, Kevin was Director of APAC marketing for the IP Services business unit (formerly Shasta Networks) of Nortel Networks. Prior to joining Nortel through the Bay Networks acquisition, Kevin spent two years with Bay Networks in California running product marketing for several routing and switching product families. He also spent several years at Monash University researching high performance IP and ATM networking techniques and publishing several papers in local and international journals.

    [index]

    Extending Advanced IP Services across multiple administrative domains: the Ipsphere Initiative

    Abstract:

    The QoS capabilities of routers and switches give the infrastructure layer the capability to assure network performance and give enhanced (or degraded) service to applications as required. This in turn means that, within your own administrative domain you can design an IP network that can be all things to all users without having to resort to massive overprovisioning and hence massive costs. In effect, you can virtualise a single IP infrastructure to provide just the grade of service required to each application and inhibit applications with different requirements and behaviours from interfering with each other and you can get more bang for your telecommunications buck.

    The problem is, only a subset of services are confined within a single administrative domain but there is no accepted way of extending all the required elements for virtualisation (such as QoS marking, identity and trust relationships, charging, billing and settlement regimes, etc.) across administrative boundaries. The IPsphere Forum is an industry body comprising equipment vendors, service providers and major academic backbone providers which has been set up to address this problem, developing an inter-domain service model using federations, web services and emerging identity and security/trust standards. This presentation will report the current status of IPsphere forum work and give an overview of the technical standards and service models being developed.

    [index]

    Mark Johnson

    Bio:

    Mark Johnson, Chief Technology Officer, MCNC

    Mark's career encompasses 20 years of leadership experience in the management, engineering, and operations of Internet technologies. During his nine year tenure at MCNC, he has served in various senior level technology leadership roles, including manager and director of Internet Technologies and most recently as director of Advanced Technologies, leading the transformation of NCREN from a star-configured network with point-to-point links to a sophisticated network of gigabit-class connections, optical rings, and regional points of presence. During that same time period, he has managed a 100-fold increase in Internet usage.

    [index]

    Optical and hybrid optical/packet networks

    Abstract:

    Optical and hybrid optical/packet networks, lessons learned from the US experiences.

  • Why do we need them?
  • What's involved in implementing them?

    The North Carolina Research & Education Network which has been working on deploying fiber/optical network for several years.

    This presentation will also draw on experience with

  • QUILT's (the consortium of Internet2 GigaPoPs)
  • The Control Plane working group of GLIF (the Global Integrated Lambda Facility)
  • The National Science Foundation-funded DRAGON (Dynamic Resource Allocation over GMPLS), and
  • Internet2's HOPI (Hybrid Optical-Packet Infrastructure) initiatives

    Plus comment about the National Experiments Support Services Center for the National LambdaRail (NLR), and hence the Hybrid Optical Packet Infrastructure test bed,

    [index]

    Associate Professor Colin Carati

    Bio:

    Associate Professor Colin Carati, Assistant Dean for Support Services in the School of Medicine, Flinders University

    Associate Professor Colin Carati is Asst Dean for Support Services in the School of Medicine, Flinders University. His role covers infrastructure and IT management for a Medical School that has a significant rural and remote component and both national and international research and teaching collaborations. He has recently become involved in Advanced Networking Applications across South Australia (www.sapac.adelaide.au) and the Asia-Pacific Region (as a member of the Medical Working Group of the Asia-Pacific Advanced Network. When not engaged in Advanced Networking and IT matters, he teaches and researches in anatomy and physiology, especially the microcirculation, lymphatics and inflammation.

    [index]

    Medical Applications for Advanced Networking

    Abstract:

    Medicine and digital technologies are powerfully synergistic when combined. Advanced multimedia technologies, innovative applications and high capacity networking provide an enabling environment that moulds the development and application of medical learning and research, while the needs of the medical community have an influence on the direction that some digital technologies might take. This presentation will explore some of the areas of current and future interaction between medicine and advanced networking. Examples will be given of high quality interactive digital video links for surgical training between Australia and Japan, Korea and Singapore, with minimal time delays. Some of the networks currently working in this domain will be outlined, including in the Asia-Pacific region (see eg http://www.apan.net/wg/medical.html). The presentation will outline some barriers to, and facilitators for, adoption of these new technologies, including some technical ones. One of the most critical factors in the success of these endeavours is effective collaboration between a team of medical and technical specialists.

    [index]

    Jeff McDonell

    Bio:

    Jeff McDonell, DART Project Director, Monash University

    Jeff McDonell has worked as IT Director at Lingnan University in Hong Kong, as well as the University of Southern Queensland in Toowoomba. Previously he worked as ITS Manager at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne.

    More recently, he has worked on a number of consultancies, including building fibre optic networks in Victoria with VERNet, plus whole-of-university costing of IT services for the University of Melbourne and Monash University.

    His early working years were spent at the University of Melbourne in the Education Faculty/Melbourne CAE, University Computer Services, Veterinary Science and the Physiology department. He also spent two years in the mid 80s as Southern Regional Manager for the Sydney IT company, Network Computer Services.

    His formal education includes a PhD and BSc(Hons) from LaTrobe University, plus an MBA and BSc from Monash University, both in Melbourne.

    [index]

    DART - developing toolkits for e-Research

    Abstract:

    DART or 'Dataset acquisition/accessibility/annotation e-Research Technology' is a MERRI project funded by DEST to support collaborative research in Australia.

    Its objectives are to develop tools to handle all data and information management requirements for any research discipline, through the seven stages of research of:

    1. collecting data
    2. managing data
    3. analysing data to produce information
    4. managing that information
    5. collaboration and annotation on the information
    6. publicising the information
    7. searching this information.

    DART is a proof-of-concept project involving about 40 researchers in 27 work packages managed by a Project Office and 7 Chief Investigators in three universities, namely Monash, Queensland and James Cook.

    [index]

    Simon Downey

    Bio:

    Simon Downey, General Manager, Face To Face Communications International Limited

    Simon Downey is the General Manager of Face To Face Communications International Limited, the Australian and New Zealand Distributor of Codian. He has many years of experience with legacy ISDN videoconferencing, initially as a service provider and event organiser for international videoconferencing before becoming involved with the move to IP videoconferencing.

    Because of close involvement with the development of the Codian IP videoconferencing infrastructure products and their use in the educational market Simon has become aware of the challenges facing content providers and videoconferencing administrators in the use of this technology. As a result Face To Face has developed software solutions which enhance the functionality of the Codian products and make them easier to use.

    Although not technical, Simon has been the interface between the users with their requirements and the program developers. With the help of some of those actually in the field, including Tom Mills from Wright State University in Ohio, USA, Simon will share some of the more exciting recent developments in this area.

    [index]

    Video Streaming and Content Management for Educators

    Abstract:

    Using modern videoconferencing technology to record, process and disseminate interactive video, audio and content to a geographically and technologically diverse audience.

    With the increasing use of videoconferencing technology as a means of capturing content in the educational sector there is an increasing challenge to content producers and videoconferencing administrators to ensure that this content is available to as many people as possible, regardless of their geographical location or available technology.

    This challenge is particularly difficult in Australia, where we have the challenges of a vast geographic spread combined with the stated intention of the Government and wish of most educators that a student should not be disadvantaged because of their location or limited technical resources. The vast geographic spread is a challenge because of restrictions on affordable bandwidth in remote locations.

    What is obvious is that the use of videoconferencing technology to record video, voice and content is rapidly expanding, particularly in the Educational sector. With the rapid expansion the task of administering the process has to be automated to cope with the demand.

    In this presentation we will show the recording of video, voice and data using current videoconferencing technology and automatically making the content available for:

  • Immediate streaming from the recorder via H.323 or web browser
  • After completion of the presentation the ability to
  • Transcode into multiple formats, QuickTime, WMP, MP3, iPod etc and placement on to external streaming servers if required.
  • The ability to stream video, audio and content from a web browser
  • Stream audio and content only from a web site
  • Stream audio only from a web site
  • Download the complete presentation or audio only onto an MP3 player or iPod
  • Variations on the above.

    This will be a practical session with input via videoconferencing from overseas users of this technology. At the end of the session attendees will be able to access the presentation in all of the above formats.

    [index]

    David Wallom

    Bio:

    David Wallom, Technical Manager, Oxford e-Research Centre

    David Wallom is Technical Manager of the Oxford e-Research Centre, prior to this he was the Campus Grid Manager. In his present role he is expected to engage the wider community within various Oxford departments by constructing a campus grid with resources from four different departments.

    Previously he has been the Operations Director for the Centre for e-Research Bristol which included constructing a campus wide computation grid with the brief to include as many computationally active departments as possible. The experience of constructing a campus grid for Bristol helped engage the wider community through the Global Grid Forum Production Grid Services Research Group of which David is co-chair.

    Earlier he had worked in the UK e-Science Grid Support Centre at CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. This provided international contacts through groups in CERN and through his role as the UK representative in the European Grid Support centre and with the Globus team at Argonne National Laboratory.

    He has previously employed by the space software company SCISYS (Space) Ltd working on the Meteosat Second Generation ground system. And been the lead developer on the Radiation transport and XX subcomponents for the ESA SpaceGrid project. He has a degree in Applied Physics from Coventry University which included a year in industry at Forschungszentrum J?lich working on the COSY-TOF experiment. He has a PhD in Experimental Particle Physics from the University of Bristol having worked on the BaBar experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre.

    David is also currently chair of the UK e-Science Engineering Task Force.

    [index]

    Networks binding the 21st Century University

    Abstract:

    Within a twenty first century university it is important that as many resources as possible be linked. This includes resources used for administration, teaching and research.

    Modern research especially involves links to a range of organisations from small locally-based companies to a large multinationals. It is essential that systems are in place to dynamically link these types of organisations for collaborative research and to allow IP sharing.

    Underpinning all these challenges is the network as such it is essential that the system backbone is adequately flexible. This needs to allow facilities such as dynamic reservation for international instrument sharing experiments plus permanent network changes necessary for an intra-grid between departments. We must also face the increasing demand for mobile networking for students and staff.

    A case study will be explored showing the construction of a campus grid system. It will describe the network changes necessary not only for the systems to initially function but also allow remote user access and connection of various resources from the standard department clusters to the institutional supercomputer and repository.

    Another example described will be the use of university and remote resources through the connection of systems through a lambda network. This will show the use of large experimental resources in parallel with real-time computational simulation and collaborative technologies. Where previously this has been the preserve of large research organisations it is moving increasingly into the standard university research group and so must be catered for.

    We will also deal with the necessary social interactions that are mandated by the construction of an institution wide system such as this and ensure its longer-term survival. This will be especially important when dealing with responsibility for these systems.

    [index]

    Chris Grist

    Bio:

    Chris Grist, QUT Web Team, QUT

    Chris Grist is a student of IT and Communication Design at QUT. Currently nearing the end of his studies, he is working for a year in the QUT Web Team as part of the faculty of IT Co-operative education scheme. Chris has grown up in a digital-friendly environment, and would be considered a 'Digital Native'. He finds his current role in the Web Team suits him well at the overlapping point of his two areas of study.

    [index]

    Digital Natives - Engage Them or Enrage Them

    Abstract:

    The integration of digital natives into the workplace means organisations now have special responsibilities to build interpersonal skills and values that enable trusted relationships to form. Digital natives need the tribe more than ever as a place for developing trusting values, practicing people skills safely and preparing for less forgiving workplaces.

    What new methods of interacting with an organisation will today's users prefer to use? Wireless laptops, palm pilots, texting from mobile phones etc? This means interaction anytime, anywhere, with anything.

    How will today's digital natives (a la QUT students etc) differ from digital immigrants like you and I. What other emerging technologies will impact on our working relationships?

    [index]

    [BoF] Discuss activities and progress of the AARNet IPTEL Working Group

    Abstract:

    AARNet's IPTEL Working Group exists to enable a place for people to work together on issues arising around IP Telephones. This topic area is undergoing a massive increase in scope with the advent of SIP based technologies. This session enables interested people to discuss what they can do as a collective to help each other.

    [index]

    [BoF] for all members of the AARNet community especially RNO Technical Advisory and Management Group

    Abstract:

    Presenters will include the CEO, Deputy CEO, Regional Network Managers and other key AARNet staff. The session is intended to be interactive, please come prepared with questions or topics for discussion.

    [index]

    Malcolm Caldwell

    Bio:

    To be provided.

    [index]

    [BoF] Video over IP Survey - results, conclusions and next steps, followed by discussion

    Abstract:

    The AARNet Video BOF will present the findings from the recent CAUDIT and user surveys on video over IP. This talk will be presented via Videoconference from the AARNet office in Canberra. The presentation will also share feedback from meetings with CANARIE, SURFNet, Internet2, UKERNA, SWITCH ARENs that are involved in Video over IP and the current views of Polycom, Aethra and Tandberg suppliers. The 20-25 minute presentation will highlight information and conclusions on the following focus areas:

  • Patterns in Adoption and Use
  • H.323 & SIP
  • Multi-site/domain interoperability
  • Personalised applications
  • Benefits & Barriers
  • End point & user interfaces
  • Next steps - for the Video Steering Committee & for AARNet

    A discussion will then follow after the presentation.

    [index]

    Kewin Stoeckigt

    Bio:

    Kewin Stoeckigt has studied Computer science at the University of Leipzig (Germany), Goettingen (Germany) and Auckland (New Zealand). In 2002 he received his BSc (Computer Science) from the University of Goettingen and in May 2005 he received his MSc from the University of Auckland respectively. Before joining AARNet, Kewin was working for the Computing Center and the Institute of Plasmaphysics of Max-Planck Gesellschaft in Munich where he was responsible for the security concepts of the videoconferencing infrastructure, which includes, Gatekeepers, MCUs and Directory Services. His main research interest is network measurement, and Kewin is currently working on his PhD at the University of Melbourne in that area.

    [index]

    James Sankar

    Bio:

    James Sankar is AARNet's Director for Application and Services. He is based in Canberra, Australia and is responsible for managing development activities in three key areas (1) Content Management & Delivery, (2) Real Time Communications, (3) Middleware and Security. James is also a member of the eduroam global working group and Internet2 SALSA and Fixed Wireless NetAuth working groups. He is also the co-chair of the APAN Middleware Working Group.

    James joined AARNet as a Middleware Network Engineer in April 2005 and was actively participated in the successful ARIIC bid to fund the MAPS project and continues to be closely involved. He was also involved in project managing ENUM Registrar trial services that led to successful accreditation in the Australian National ENUM trial and the production of an informative website and secure portal for enum registrations and enum updates in July 2005.

    Prior to joining AARNet, James worked for UKERNA (2001-2005) as Authentication and Authorisation Development Manager where he was responsible for the creation of a Location Independent Trial (eduroam) that is now a fully supported production service (JANET Roaming Service). James was the co-chair of the Terena Mobility taskforce (2001-2005). During his time at UKERNA, James is successfully managed a number of Network Access project at UKERNA including a JANET ADSL trial, a two-way satellite trial and the formation of a JANET Wireless Advisory Group.

    [index]

    Matt Bailey

    Bio:

    Matt is a recent QUT Bachelor of Information Technology graduate, and has been working for his alma mater since late 2004 as part of the QUT Web Team. His work and IT interests extend to all things web-related, but with a particular focus on web standards, accessibility, user experience and information architecture.

    Matt's formative years straddled the hazy period that heralded the emergence of digital natives as a distinct group from digital immigrants, and happily exists with one foot in both generations.

    [index]

    Scott Sinclair

    Bio:

    Scott Sinclair evaluates emerging technologies applicable to the tertiary education sector in the Strategic Technologies Group, ITS, at The University of Queensland. He holds a Bachelor of Science from UQ and is currently working towards a Masters of Philosophy (Astrophysics) at USQ.

    Previously responsible for the development of a campus-wide wireless solution for UQ's core sites, Scott is now focusing his attention on various aspects of collaboration, including VoIP, VIDoIP, instant messaging and the ever-increasing effect of 'presence' on teaching, learning and the University ecosystem (DING!).

    [index]

    The University Ecosystem, or presence and what it means for you

    Abstract:

    Real-time collaboration, the killer app that's been promised for so long now may just become a reality in the University environment. With the explosion of VoIP, SIP and IM, collaboration is almost becoming a by-product of the 'always-connected' masses, with users changing the way they choose to interact and work together. How many presence-enabled applications do you deal with daily? How many will you (or should you) support in the future, and what will this mean for the design, deployment and evolution of University networks over the longer term.

    A brief overview of the requirements, challenges and solutions that The University of Queensland are facing in this rapidly evolving space

    [index]

    Steve Cox

    Bio:

    Steve is the manager of Communication Services at Flinders University of South Australia (FUSA) and has worked in various technical roles within the Information Services Division at FUSA for the past 17 years. The previous 9 years he held a position in the electrical maintenance department at FUSA. Steve has worked on AARNet projects since 1998 and has been a member of the IP Tel Steering Committee since its inception.

    [index]

    Demonstration and Panel discussion on H.323/SIP peering to support Voice, Video, Presence and Instant Messaging.

    Abstract:

    SIP and H.323 IP Telephones, and Video devices from a range of Universities and CSIRO will demonstrated in this session to show how calls can be made between each other together including via a SIP proxy server with a description of how it works. A panel discussion will follow the demonstration covering the previous presentation and the demonstration itself.

    [index]

    Steve Johnston

    Bio:

    Steve Johnston has been providing IT services within Universities for about fourteen years. He has experiences involving desktop and network support in a vast variety of flavours: Macintosh, UNIX, PC, Novell, Sun and more. It is this variety that has brought great flexibility and understanding in the way that services are provided by himself and his team.

    In 1999 Steve was technical lead for ECU in the design, implementation and deployment of switched Ethernet network - a network that replaced all equipment across the University in about 9 weeks (installation was performed over 3 weekends). He has been involved in the development of the network since that time - the core network is still essentially the same, but the network has involved into a highly resilient and stable platform which has been the basis for many IT developments within the University.

    Since 2000, Steve has been the Manager of IT Infrastructure Services - looking after the network, telephones, servers and directory of the University - amongst other things. He has a Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Systems from Curtin University.

    [index]

    Andrew Rutherford

    Bio:

    Andrew has over 15 years experience in the IT and telecommunications industry. Prior to forming Iagu Networks, he filled a variety of roles at Internode, a major regional ISP, including Research and Development Manager and Technical Manager, and a variety of network and systems support roles at the University of Adelaide. Since forming Iagu Networks in 1997 he has been involved in meeting the varied demands of major corporates and ISP's, including a year and a half working for Scitec/Marconi setting up their Internet and Security team.

    He has a Honours BSc (Ma & Comp Sci) degree specialising in Computer Science and is certified under the CCIE? program

    [index]

    Nigel Barling

    Bio:

    Nigel Barling has worked for the CSIRO since 2002 in their Network Operations Group working on CSIROs Voice and Video Network.

    Nigel is currently Technical Lead for CSIROs Video Conferencing and Collaboration Project which has deployed 85 Polycom vSX room based units throughout CSIRO and associated Video VLANs, the Polycom Global Management System, 2 Cisco 3540 MCUs and 6 State-based Cisco ISDN/IP Bridges. Cisco Meetingplace also in the process of being deployed.

    Nigel is a member of the AARNET Video over IP Working Group.

    [index]

    Video Conferencing Upgrade - Lessons Learnt

    Abstract:

    CSIROs previous Video Conference Environment has been made up of over 20 different models of video conference endpoints, Setup in an ad-hoc manner over the course of 5 years across 85 rooms. The Refresh was designed to replace all 85 units with a single Model for ease of remote management, training and configuration. Included in the Project was the installation of a Cisco MCU Cluster, and 5 Cisco ISDN/IP Gateways.

    This presentation will be giving an overview of the deployment and the lesson¡¦s learnt.

    [index]

    Janos G Fekete

    Bio:

    Janos has 25 years experience in Communications from public switching and Digital transmission to CPE (Customers Private equipment). His experience spans new platform introduction, engineering planning, implementation and integration of existing technology with emerging technologies.

    He has spent a number of years in pre sales Systems Engineering with Enterprise and SME customers specializing in Voice & Data integration with business applications including VOIP.

    As Product Manager for Converged Products at NEC Business Solutions Ltd his expertise now includes SIP support on NEC products.

    [index]

    SIP Realities Presentation

    Abstract:

    Janos's presentation on the reality of SIP will cover everything you want and need to know about SIP. From the current status of SIP in today's market including the marketing hype to what SIP really means for your business.

    Hear about actual "trench" issues, third party devices, integration and tweaks, to how vendors authorise a third party device and official support clauses.

    A must see presentation for anyone considering open standards telephony.

    [index]

    Andrew Bycroft

    Bio:

    Andrew Bycroft, Regional Sales Engineer, ANZ, is a security specialist with more than ten years experience in networking and security. Andrew has skills across a diversity of security concepts in addition to holding many certifications including the much sought after CISSP certification.

    Before joining Fortinet International Inc, Andrew worked for leading voice, data, applications and cabling systems integrator, Integ Communications and, prior to that, global integrator and managed services provider, Atos Origin. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from La Trobe University in Victoria.

    [index]

    Putting Colour into Grey Applications: IM and P2P

    Abstract:

    This paper discusses the emerging threats that are specifically targeting IM and P2P and include the issues brought on through usage within the academic environment in addition to attacks from external sources. Whilst some administrators would gladly want to block all IM and P2P application usage, it is often difficult to block ad also brings about many complaints from users who claim to have legitimate usage. The options are thus: block all IM and P2P usage or take control of it. Fortinet discusses how it fulfills both of these options.

    [index]

    Bradley Beddoes

    Bio:

    Bradley Beddoes is the Senior Network Programmer in the Networks Applications team at the Queensland University of Technology.

    In addition to operational responsibility for core services, my larger development projects undertaken at QUT include architecture design and development of authentication systems, QUT's real time internet throttling/accounting system and JEE technology based web portals.

    A long time supporter of Open Source, as both a developer on large projects and incubator of new projects, I believe there is much benefit that can be derived from utilising the open source model. Open standards and software will provide the best possible basis, through the use of existing infrastructure, for building a strong Federation in the smallest timeframe possible.

    [index]

    Federated middleware architectures, how QUT are applying Shibboleth and the MAMS project to the ATN Group of Universities egrad school and to the wider QUT Authentication SSO System

    Abstract:

    This presentation will give a short history of the current ATN system for intra university authentication and resource sharing. It will provide and overview of the egrad school mini grant from the MAMS project. It will explain what has been achieved and how QUT are applying shibboleth to replace the current in house system.

    Details on the future plans for the model of QUT Enterprise Authentication will be given together with how we intend to integrate shibboleth and web services to create a platform neutral architecture.

    [index]

    Shaun Mangelsdorf

    Bio:

    Shaun Mangelsdorf is a student in IT and Maths, currently working as a Network Programmer under QUT's cooperative education program. Following and developing with open source software for a number of years as a hobby has provided a strong foundation to begin his career. With interests heavily seated in the realm of authentication and networked services, his current role provides a lot of opportunity for development.

    [index]

    Tim Rayner

    Bio:

    Tim Rayner has a BE & BSc from UNSW, and experience in the telecommunications industry - prior to joining Charles Sturt Universities' networking team 12 years ago. During that time he has overseen the development of CSU's network through a number of generations to the recent roll-out of new gigabit campus networks.

    Tim's team also administers CSU's telephone systems - which have changed little during that time. We are actively trialling VoIP technologies to ensure that our next telephone system also serves us well.

    [index]

    Asterisk VoIP - extending and complementing the PABX

    Abstract:

    Charles Sturt University has recently implemented an Asterisk VoIP solution to provide telephony services to over 350 student residence bedrooms across 3 different campuses. The Asterisk system interfaces with our Ericsson PABX systems through QSIG trunks and Cisco VoIP gateways. The solution provides a SIP telephone in each residence bedroom formerly lacking a telephony service, and aims to replicate the features of the PABX system available to other students. The presentation will work through our experiences with this deployment - including handset selection, infrastructure upgrades, server configuration and deployment strategies. We will also discuss any barriers that might prevent this being a general solution to our university telephony requirements.

    [index]

    Roger Tolhurst

    Bio:

    Roger Tolhurst has a BDS (USYD) and a BIT (CSU). For the last 5 years he has worked for Charles Sturt University at the Wagga Campus as a member of the networks team. More recently he has had involvement in the testing and deployment of the university's evolving IP telephony services.

    [index]

    John Butkiewicz

    Bio:

    John Butkiewicz was originally appointed as the Chief Technology Officer in June 2005 however now has assumed a broader role as the Chief Adviser to the Managing Director Huawei Australia.

    With extensive experience in telecom industry, John in his Chief Adviser role provides high level executive advice and support to the Managing Director and Account groups across the Australian Telecommunications market including 22 South Pacific islands. With his understanding of the key issues driving telecommunications he engages the Australian market demonstrating the significant value and innovation Huawei can bring to our customers.

    John comes to Huawei with 30 years' experience in global telecom industry having previously worked in senior positions in both operator and vendor environments. His previous roles cover the value chain from engineering technology, product management, strategic planning, service operations through business development, marketing and direct sales.

    Prior to joining Huawei, John had worked for Telstra for over twenty years as well as Alcatel, Ericsson and Link Telecommunications.

    [index]

    Building the Secured Campus Network

    Abstract:

    The speech will discuss about security issues in Campus network, and the solutions of network design, deploying firewalls, user access control applications and etc. It will talk about both the current mature industry solutions, as well as the future technology trend.

    [index]

    Russell G. Colbert

    Bio:

    Russ Colbert joined Polycom, Inc. in April 2001 as the Global Education Market Manager. His responsibilities are to ensure complete customer and partner success, product development related to the education segment and to facilitate industry utilization of educational technology. Prior to joining the company, Russ was the Director of Global Markets with VTEL Corporation. He has worked for Peirce-Phelps, the World's largest Integrator of videoconferencing and interactive Distance Education. Also, the United States Navy as Video-teletraining Officer.

    Russ holds a BSc from Auburn University and an MSc from Old Dominion University. He is an active member of the Board of Directors of the United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA), Learning Technology User Group Australia, JeLA Japan and UKDLA United Kingdom. He has served as Chairperson for the Education Program for the International Teleconferencing Association Tradeshow and Exhibit, ITCA. He is a regular speaker at major conferences and has published a number of books and papers.

    [index]

    Interactive content - accessing, preparation and provision of relevant content for to day's knowledge student

    Abstract:

    Today many schools, museums, cultural institutions, associations, and even ships are installing fully interactive video conferencing. The ability to make connections and share content, culture, and knowledge has never before been so easy and extensive. Educational institutions have the opportunity to maximize existing investments in video conferencing technology not merely by making available content from the far reaches of the globe to local students but also by developing and providing content of relevance to classrooms, worldwide. Russ will present from his experiences how institutions are gearing themselves to become recognized content providers for today's knowledge student.

    [index]

    Ian Gilchrist

    Bio:

    Ian Gilchrist is a seasoned network engineer specialising in infrastructure security for TippingPoint, a Division of 3com. As such he covers Australia, New Zealand, India and Japan. Ian has worked on several large projects and customer networks including Coles Myer, the Fosters Group. He has also worked in the Banking sector, Defence and Government.

    [index]

    Network Security and the Evolution of IPS

    Abstract:

    How is IPS evolving and what is REAL IPS all about. What are the advantages of IPS and what are typical deployment scenarios.

    What does your current security system NOT cover? What are typical areas of weakness specific to education.

    IPS does not require any change to infrastructure - it is an addition only, with literally no change to core systems

    [index]

    Rob McIntyre

    Bio:

    Rob McIntyre is Operations Strategies Development Manager, Powerlink Queensland. As such he is responsible for the business development strategy for the non-regulated telecommunication income stream. Amongst many other duties, this involves the management of the co-location of telecommunication carriers on Powerlink transmission towers.

    Previously he has been Manager Operations Strategies, this involved developing and implementing Powerlink's strategy to move from Microwave telecommunications backbone to fibre.

    Rob has a Bachelor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Queensland University of Technology and an Associate Diploma in Electrical Engineering from Queensland Institute of Technology. He is a Corporate Member of the Institution of Engineers Australia Electrical College and a Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland.

    [index]

    Powerlink Queensland: Supporting Telecommunications for Tertiary Education in Queensland

    Abstract:

    Powerlink owns, operates and maintains the high voltage electricity transmission network that stretches 1,700km from Cairns to the New South Wales border and transports electricity in bulk from power stations to the electricity distribution networks operated by Energex and Ergon Energy. The performance of this Queensland Government-owned corporation has consistently benchmarked in the top quartile internationally with respect to transmission network reliability and cost efficiency. This is partly attributable to Powerlink's use of new technology to improve the operation of its transmission network and the extensive and significant telecommunications network that supports it.

    Utilising surplus capacity within their telecommunications network, Powerlink is now providing bulk telecommunications services in its service area to AARNet, a telecommunications carrier that supports Australian tertiary education institutions. The first phase is already operational and comprises telecommunications services to universities in Townsville, Rockhampton and Brisbane.

    [index]

    Geoff Sweeney

    Bio:

    Geoff is a co-founder of Tier-3 and heads an experienced IT security software development team responsible for the inception and development of the revolutionary HUNTSMAN product. With more than 13 years experience as principal of a highly successful IT security company Geoff has provided professional services along with security analysis and advice to a large number of major corporations. Prior to establishing Tier-3 Geoff was a Senior Security Systems Architect at a major international telecommunications firm.

    [index]

    Can you even see the risks that are threatening your enterprise?

    Abstract:

    Geoff Sweeney, CTO of Tier-3, will demonstrate why there is irrefutable evidence that existing IT security management technologies have serious limitations in their ability to protect enterprises and their IT assets. The use of these systems, even in conjunction with vulnerability assessment and system patching protocols is problematic in its effectiveness as a means of securing the enterprise. High volume, real time, adaptive protective technologies can manage security compliance and protect the enterprise against loss resulting from security breaches at the application, operating system and infrastructure level, irrespective of whether they are generated from beyond or within the perimeter.

    He will discuss that by using technologies that use systematic, repeatable risk management-based methodologies to collect, analyse and contextualise event logs the enterprise can deliver instant risk adjusted alerting and response to illegal or non-compliant IT activity.

    Additionally, Geoff will prove that whether you are tasked with detecting enterprise specific targeted worms, control point failures of business systems, processes and procedures or forensic analysis of audit trails, only systems which see beyond specific threat signatures to the suspicious and unusual can truly achieve IT governance and protect sensitive stakeholder information and intellectual property.

    He will conclude with an update on Tier-3 's Behavioural Anomaly Detection technology within the Huntsman Threat Management System. With a number of successful deployments within high volume, mission-critical enterprises Huntsman has demonstrated how it instantly identifies and responds to unusual or unfamiliar system behaviour.

    [index]

    Peter Grant

    Bio:

    Peter Grant is the Assistant Director-General of the Office of Government ICT within the Department of Public Works. He has held this position from 2005.

    In this role, Peter fosters and develops relationships between the Office of Government ICT and the private sector, forming partnership arrangements to aid delivery of whole-of-Government and multi-agency initiatives. Peter plays a fundamental role in driving and implementing the action items of the Smart Directions Statement; the key government planning tool to guide Queensland Government ICT investment in projects and services.

    Previous to his current position, Peter was the founding Director of Consulting for Gartner Asia Pacific. Peter's high level of proficiency in strategic planning and customer development was utilised by more than 60 national and international clients. Peter is recognised as an expert in leadership development, business strategy, program management, and risk management.

    His 30 year IT career highlights also include:

  • Establishing Gartner - an ICT research and analysts company in Queensland and the ACT;
  • Co-founding OZONE Systems - a technology start up company;
  • Managing the IT operations of one of Australia's largest networks as the Director, Information Technology and Corporate Systems at Queensland Transport;
  • Post graduate university lecturer and current Faculty Board Member at three universities; and
  • Current member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

    [index]

    Governance in a Web Services World - We have got one Chance to Get it Right

    Abstract:

    When Web Services were first conceived it was believed they would allow more flexible connections between organisations with existing business relationships - at the very least known business relationships. For example, Web Services might allow a supplier to easily link to a customer for orders, invoicing etc. Today organisations have gone to the next level of Web Services. Instead of improving existing business process, some organisations have recognised that Web Services provide an opportunity to not just transform business processes but to create completely a new business opportunity.

    Larger organisations such as governments and universities are now faced with a challenge not seen for almost 20 years in the IT industry - a green field. How can we ensure that the diverse areas of our organisation present the right set of Web Services to an external business community that is racing to create new and innovative ways to work with us?

    We have but one chance to set our governance frameworks and standards to ensure the benefits of Web Services are maximised for all. Will we get it right?

    [index]

    Andre Winarto

    Bio:

    Andre Winarto is currently Strategy Manager at SingTel Optus in Sydney, Australia. He has been at Optus for two years, and is one of the architects of Optus Business' transformation strategy. He was also heavily involved in the acquisition of Alphawest in 2005.

    Andre has a decade of experience working at large multinational corporations such as Shell Oil, Baxter International, Akzo Nobel and SingTel Optus in a variety of functions including strategy, internal corporate ventures, marketing, and engineering.

    Andre earned his MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in Chicago, where he majored in strategy, marketing and finance. Andre's undergraduate degree was in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New South Wales in Sydney.

    Andre enjoys travelling, and has lived in four countries and seven cities.

    [index]

    ICT Industry Trends and Industry Consolidation

    Abstract:

    The telecommunications and IT industries are increasingly overlapping. Not only is the technology converging, but the companies providing the services to deliver it are consolidating too. As part of this industry consolidation, SingTel Optus acquired Alphawest in late 2005 strengthening Alphawest's ability to deliver complete ICT services, consulting, solutions and managed services offerings across Australia.

    Optus and Alphawest now collaborate on an increasing number of accounts to offer customers IP network consulting services, the carriage, as well as the information management software to increase enterprise productivity. This presentation will go into the drivers behind two major technology trends: IP and Information Management, and the subsequent effect on industry consolidation.

    [index]

    Glen Turner

    Bio:

    Glen Turner is a network engineer with Australia's Academic and Research Network. He designed and implemented Quality of Service for the AARNet2 and AARNet3 networks.

    [index]

    [BoF] Campus QoS design

    Abstract:

    This Birds of a Feather session opens with a recap of the AARNet2 QoS design and the AARNet3 QoS design. The AARNet3 QoS design is a straightforward implementation of Differentiated Services, and the properties of each QoS class offered by AARNet3 are described.

    A number of generic campus network QoS designs that interoperate with AARNet3's QoS offering are then explored.

    The remainder of the time, for as long as participants desire, is taken with exploring the campus network QoS designs of the participants and how these can be made to interoperate with AARNet3.

    Participants are asked to bring network diagrams which focus on their network's AARNet edge and core. These diagrams (in PDF, JPEG or PNG format) can be e-mailed to the presenter beforehand so that they can be projected for all participants to see. Alternatively, diagrams on paper can be left with the conference Registration Desk before Wednesday evening and that enough copies will be made for all participants. Hand-written diagrams are fine: BoFs are about substance not style.

    The presenter's e-mail address is glen dot turner at aarnet dot edu dot au. If there is any topic you would like to add to the above agenda please contact the presenter.

    [index]

    Dr Greg Wickham

    Bio:

    Greg joined AARNet's Infrastructure Development in June 2006 to support deployment of optical initiatives into the Australian Research and Education community. Prior to commencing with AARNet he was the GrangeNet Network Operations Manager (since July 2002). At GrangeNet, in addition to maintaining the network on a day-to-day basis he liaised with the R&E community (both Australian and International); conducted workshops on network technologies; co-designed the GrangeNet II architecture in collaboration with Cisco optical engineers; and provided support for activities that used the GrangeNet network. Historically prior to joining GrangeNet he had several roles at Deakin University: tutoring and lecturing in the School of Computing and Mathematics, and finally Network Section Leader (ITSD). He has a PhD in Computer Science.

    [index]

    Connecting the Australian Education & Research Communities: The AARNet Optical Network

    Abstract:

    Mid May 2006 the 5th and final leg of AARNet's Optical Network was commissioned. This milestone completes the first phase of the strategic vision for AARNet to provide multi layered services to the Australian Education and Research communities. Since its inception AARNet has traditionally provided Layer 3 services, however with the deployment of the optical backbones it is now possible to provision gigabit point to point services. These services can be used for regional inter-connections, connections to AARNet3, private wide area networks, and "transient light path" style services, the latter applicable for supporting demanding research applications. Recognising that the "last mile" is an important aspect of any network, AARNet also provides an end to end infrastructure solution (including project management) for our customers.

    This presentation will focus on two aspects of the AARNet optical network. First an architectural and implementation overview will be presented so that the community has a broader understanding of how this technology can be leveraged. Second, case studies will be provided that give examples on how members of the AARNet community are benefiting from the optical network.

    The AARNet Optical Network currently connects Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne and Adelaide, with plans in place to connect other capitals in the future.

    [index]

    Ivan Philips

    Bio:

    Ivan Philips has been working with AARNet since the end of 2004. He has been responsible for AARNet3 member edge roll outs as well as the design and and implementation of the AARnet3 national transmission network

    Prior to working for AARNet Ivan spent seven years at the University of New South Wales in a number of roles including support, systems administration, networking engineering and network design. This was interspersed by a few brief stints in the commercial side of the industry with NewsCorp and Optus.

    Ivan holds a BSc from the University of New South Wales and is also CCIE certified.

    [index]

    Doug Farmer

    Bio:

    Doug Farmer is AARNet's Project Development Manager. He recently managed the implementation of the AARNet Optical Network, linking Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne and Adelaide. His broader role involves the extension of programme and project management disciplines across the organisation.

    Prior to joining AARNet, Doug spent 12 year with Optus, involved in strategic consulting and project management across a range of industries. One of his early projects for Optus was the AARNet2 rollout in 1997. Doug holds a Bachelor of Business and Electronic Commerce (Monash), a Diploma in Project Management (UNE) and is a member of the Australian Institute of Project Management.

    [index]

    Terry Sloan

    Bio:

    Mr Terry Sloan is a Group Manager within the Software Development Group at EPCC (Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre) and a visiting fellow in the School of Information Systems at Curtin Business School, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia.

    EPCC is a European centre of expertise in advanced computing research, technology transfer and the provision of supercomputer services. Based in the University of Edinburgh in the UK, EPCC design and create computing solutions for industry and provide genuine technology leadership in Europe. EPCC work closely with world-leading computational scientists and are one of the major providers of training in HPC in Europe. EPCC provides access to a unique collection of leading-edge computing resources. EPCC participates in the HPCx consortium that provides the UK's leading national HPC service for academia. EPCC are also a member of the DEISA consortium. DEISA (Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications) is a consortium of the leading national supercomputing centres Europe. Terry is the Acitivity Leader in the DEISA consortium responsible for research into providing user-level applications access to the DEISA heterogeneous supercomputing environment by means of grid standards.

    [index]

    Standards based access to a distributed European supercomputing infrastructure

    Abstract:

    DEISA operates a persistent, production quality distributed supercomputing environment across the European continent. The purpose of this infrastructure is to enable scientific discovery by enhancing and reinforcing European capabilities in the area of high performance computing. This is through a deep integration of existing national high-end platforms, tightly coupled by a dedicated network and supported by innovative system and grid software. This presentation will describe the DEISA supercomputing environment and the research into providing application access to this infrastructure through the use of emerging grid standards.

    [index]

    Karl Turnbull

    Bio:

    Karl has been working in the IT industry for 18 years. He has worked for Telstra in Sydney, CRA and BHP in Wollongong, TAFE in Central Western NSW, Griffith University on the Gold Coast and is currently the Server Manager at Griffith University based in Brisbane. Karl has worked in a number of areas including desktop support, applications, databases, networking and servers. Karl has an Electronics Engineering Certificate and an Electrical Engineering Associate Diploma from the Wollongong Institute of TAFE, a Bachelor of Computer Science from the University of Wollongong and a Master of Business Administration with Distinction from Griffith University.

    [index]

    Storage Virtualisation

    Abstract:

    This presentation will look at how storage has evolved from direct attached storage, to storage area networks (SANs) and now to storage virtualisation. The presentation will introduce the concept of storage virtualisation including the business benefits and the current hardware and software solutions available on the market. The presentation will touch on how a number of different hardware and software solutions have been branded and rebranded under different product names. The presentation will then offer a case study about how Griffith University has established 70km of dark fibre between Brisbane and the Gold Coast for both IP and SAN traffic and obtained a selection of storage hardware and software infrastructure to deliver a best practice storage virtualisation solution. Purchased in late 2005, the storage virtualisation solution included two Sun StorEdge 9985's, two Sun StorEdge L500's and two HDS AMS500's. The storage virtualisation solution also included storage software components from the HDS HiCommand suite of software. The presentation will cover the advantages that the storage virtualisation solution delivers such as centralised management and multi-vendor tiered storage for development, research, disaster recovery and a platform for information/data lifecycle management. The presentation will cover how the storage virtualisation solution is used to copy data between Brisbane and the Gold Coast on a dedicated SAN link to provide a data replication for disaster recovery. Finally the presentation will take a brief look at the future of storage at Griffith University and the move towards information/data lifecycle management and some data archiving/compliance issues for email.

    [index]

    Jonathan Bays

    Bio:

    Jonathon Bays originally trained as an Electronics Technician then after a successful career as a sales and marketing engineer at Union Carbide (Eveready) selling primary and secondary battery systems, retrained in marketing gaining a diploma in marketing management, then moved into IT distribution taking on product development, product management, account management and business development roles.

    Jonathon Bays has been involved in the networking data and communications industry for over 15 years from the earliest days of 10Base2 coax networks. He has been involved in training the Electrical wholesale, retail and reseller channels in Ethernet, Optical Ethernet and wireless networking technologies and has gained a wealth of practical experience in these products and markets. Additionally following on from the networking design he has been involved in the design of remote, in and out of band management solutions for the hosting, carrier NOC, and industrial networking markets.

    Bays has more than 10 years of IT&T channel development experience to the role following former positions with Intel Australia and more recently in the wireless broadband sector with Australia's most profitable listed business ISP.

    [index]

    Delivering always on wireless broadband to economically motivated rural areas

    Abstract:

    Presenting a case study on the recent rollout of broadband wireless services to areas outside Parliament House, Canberra. Motorola's Canopy Wireless provided cost-effective, "last mile" high-speed data access for residential and business customers who previously were underserved or lived in locations where infrastructure is non-existent.

    Organisations need to partner with providers that specialise in rural broadband services, are registered telecommunications carriers and offer competitive plans. Most importantly ones that understand regional/rural issues and are environmentally sensitive.

    [index]

    Barry Lynam

    Bio:

    Barry has worked at QUT since 1989. This has been in many different jobs from looking after computer labs to looking after Novell Netware servers, email systems, DNS, web proxies etc. He was project manager responsible for introducing first web based email at QUT in 2000. And since 2001, has been responsible for IT security at QUT, including University-wide awareness, Network security, and changing the security culture of the University. Barry holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in Computing Science from QUT.

    [index]

    BoF: Findings from a recent SEIM (Security Event Information Management) Proof of Concept and product evaluation

    Abstract:

    QUT identified five primary objectives to be achieved in whole or in part during the PoC phase of their SEIM product evaluation:

  • To quantify the expected implementation cost and workload
  • To appraise 5 vendor & product performance
  • Understand the user response of IT support staff
  • Gain a greater awareness of the events in our own network
  • Assess the capability for reporting and forensics and build a business case for investment

    This process and findings will be discussed during this BoF session by Barry Lynam.

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