Keynote Speakers

 

Amol Mitra, Worldwide Director, Product Marketing, ProCurve Networking by HP

Bio:

Amol Mitra is the Director of Worldwide Product Marketing ProCurve Networking by HP. Mitra is responsible for defining and driving HP ProCurve's business strategy and direction by blending customer requirements, technology developments, market trends, competitive threats and business priorities.

Mitra joined HP in July 1993 and has more than 15 years of experience in the data networking and network-storage industry. Data networking has been Mitra's main area of focus since he started as a software development engineer for data communication products at HP. He was instrumental in driving revenue and profitability for HP's router and switch businesses. Mitra is a network protocol (TCP/IP, IPX) expert and holds several patents on developing cutting edge technology in the network switching area. Throughout his career, Mitra has held numerous top-level executive management positions at HP including Product Marketing Manager for HP's Network Storage Business, R&D Software Development Manager and Asia Pacific Market Development Manager for HP's data communication business.

Mitra's previous focus was in the area of storage networking, responsible for driving HP's open scalable storage network infrastructure solution. He led the marketing efforts for HP's “Storage on Ethernet” initiative while managing a geographically disperse team of individuals and partners working on the adoption of the iSCSI technology.

Mitra holds a B.S. degree in Computer Science from M.S.University, India, a Masters degree in Computer Science from Purdue University and a M.B.A. from the University of California, Davis.

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ProActive defense strategy against IT security threats

Abstract:

How do you build a flexible network infrastructure that enables your organisation to:

  • Fortify security- including Identity Management and more..
  • Embrace new applications
  • Manage costs
  • Reduce complexity
  • Increase productivity
  • Help Facilitate learning and enhance creativity

This presentation will show how your network can be made ready for the increasing number of security threats and growing requirements in the IT space.

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David Foster, Network and Communications Systems Group Leader, CERN

Bio:

Dr. David Foster is head of the communications and network group at CERN responsible for all the electronic communications at CERN. Educated as a physicist, he also holds an MBA and has been widely published in computer science journals and related publications. He has a wide range of professional interests including the business impact of grid technologies, the evolution of communications technologies, the interaction of technology and humanity and the psychology of organisational management.

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LHC: Big Science, Big Computing, Big Networks

Abstract:

The Large Hardron Collider at CERN is one of the worlds largest and most complex scientfic instruments. Due to start in 2007, it will generate many Petabytes of data per year which will be analysed by the world's physicists. The development of grid technologies will allow access to the vast computing resources needed to process the data. A combination of special purpose and general purpose networks will be used to connect the centers around the world in this grid infrastructure. The presentation will provide an overview of all these activities, comments on how they may evolve in the future and the possible socio-economic impacts of the technological changes and opportunities for large science projects.

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Dr. Tracey Wilen, Managing Director, Internet Business Solutions Group, Cisco Systems Inc

Bio:

Tracey Wilen is the Higher Education lead for the Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG). In her current role, she leads colleges and universities in innovation and excellence by using the Internet to achieve institutional goals. Before joining IBSG, Dr. Wilen-Daugenti held a number of positions at Cisco in the areas of business development, marketing, and operations. Prior to Cisco, Dr. Wilen-Daugenti held executive positions at Hewlett-Packard and Apple Computer.

Wilen-Daugenti was recognized in 1995 as a notable forthcoming modern academic researcher on women in international business. She has authored seven books. In addition, she has published numerous articles, chapters, and essays regarding international business. She is a frequent guest on national television and radio, interviewed in news columns, and a speaker for key universities and business groups, addressing the topics of women, leadership, and international business. Her website is www.globalwomen.biz

Wilen-Daugenti holds an MBA and a doctorate in international business, and is currently a visiting scholar at Stanford University. She has been an adjunct professor for graduate and doctoral programs for a number of Bay Area universities. Her areas of expertise are international business, leadership, and women studies. Dr. Wilen-Daugenti was recently named San Francisco Woman of the Year by the Women in Business Organization in San Francisco for her outreach in the fields of academia, women's research, and technology.

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Top Trends in Higher Education

Abstract:

Innovative consumer technology trends are created daily and adopted at a rapid pace. Higher Education institutions are often the first to experience these technologies that are brought in or invented by students and faculty. Many Universities have created plans on how to address current and future trends realizing that a vision for tomorrow requires planning today.

Top Trends in Higher Education will cover current trends and what higher education institutions are doing to address them on their campus. Examples will cover both the physical and virtual campus, current innovations, future directions.

Topics covered will include both strategies and actual implementations of what is taking place on campuses around the world. Key examples and demonstrations will highlight how various institutions use technology to enhance services and meet the needs of students and faculty both now and into the future.

The presentation will draw out key insights and implications for Australian universities and offer suggestions about how they should respond to the trends and changes already shaping their future.

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Jean Turgeon, Global Enterprise Solutions Engineering Leader. Nortel

Bio:

Jean Turgeon has 23 years of experience with inter-networking designs and implementation with both global service providers and Enterprise customers. Jean has also completed his Executive MBA at the University of Ottawa to add to his vast experience and current qualifications.

Prior to joining Nortel via the Bay Networks acquisition, he was at Ameridata & Bell Technical services as a Senior Network Architect and Advanced Technical Instructor. Jean has experience in research and development, marketing, support, training, sales and management. His recent activities at Nortel as part of the Enterprise CTO office have been focusing on working closely with product development teams and global customers in delivering highly reliable, scalable and secure Enterprise converged solutions.

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Secure, multimedia communications that never stop!

Abstract:

Multimedia applications are becoming increasingly important to Universities seeking to improve their efficiency and lowering their business cost. Voice-over-IP, online training through Webinars and podcasts, Instant Messaging, and video conferencing are just some applications that are being deployed today to help improve the productivity of these businesses.

Critical to the successful deployment of business critical multimedia applications is the underlying network infrastructure. Universities need to be confident that their networks are secure and will not fail. Nortel is leading the charge, with secure, multimedia communications solutions that will forever change the way you do business.

Nortel's Secure Always-on Networking Solution provides businesses with a converged network solution that is both secure and resilient.

At the core of Nortel's network resiliency architecture is a technology called Split Multi-Link Trunking. This technology enables sub second network recovery around any network failure. This ensures that users of mission critical multimedia applications like IP Phones can continue to work unaffected, even during a major network failure such as failure of a network core router.

Nortel's resilient network also extends beyond resiliency of physical network failures. Nortel's Secure Network Access solution incorporates clientless, host integrity enforcement capabilities that enhance the resiliency and security of the business enterprises by securing access to the network. This helps prevent compromised systems from launching attacks which could cripple the network.

Universities increasingly require a solution that:

  • Allow access control with both authentication and interrogation with the option not to leave or require any resident software on the device being used.
  • Access control must be scalable, support various options from 802.1x(EAPOL), to clientless (web browser), Centralized MAC address based, without compromising security.
  • Due to lack of content control on the devices used in an educational environment, it is imperative the infrastructure can quickly intercept and control new viruses, worms that may be introduced inadvertently by various devices.
  • When new viruses or threats are introduced, the network must support quick remediation and/or protection to secure the perimeters to ensure business applications remain operational and accessible without compromising the Quality of Experience. (ITM, TPS). Therefore, abnormal behaviour must be quickly detected across the network not to compromise the reliability of the infrastructure.

- End users must be able to seamlessly roam across the entire campus.

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Jerome (Jerry) W. Sobieski, Director of Research Initiatives for the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads

Bio:


Jerry Sobieski is the Director of Research Initiatives for the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX), a consortium of almost 50 research and higher education institutions in the Washington, DC region. He is responsible for developing strategic and multi-institutional network research programs that address the needs of the next generation of globally distributed “e-science” applications.

Mr. Sobieski is Principle Investigator on the DRAGON Project, an experimental optical network testbed funded by the US National Science Foundation. Located in the Washington DC region, DRAGON is developing GMPLS based dynamic hybrid control plane and service architectures. Besides his work on DRAGON, Mr. Sobieski heads up the Testbed Support Center for the Internet2 Hybrid Optical/Packet Infrastructure (HOPI), a national testbed exploring novel hybrid networking concepts. His team also supports the Global Information Grid Experimental Facility (GIG-EF) – a US Department of Defense funded advanced technology testbed also in Washington DC. Mr. Sobieski has served on the Technical Advisory Committee for the Internet2 Abilene network, the HOPI Design Team, the Atlantic Wave Engineering and Governance committees, and NetWorkMaryland Engineering Advisory Board. He is also actively involved in the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) initiative.

Before joining MAX, Mr Sobieski was the Director of Advanced Networking for Highway1, a non-profit organization in Washington DC focused on presenting the technical and policy issues of emerging global advanced internetworking to members of the US Congress and industry associations.

From 1997 until 1999, Mr Sobieski worked for the Internet2 organization as part of the Abilene design and implementation team.

Mr. Sobieski's career has been focused on high performance computing, from systems development in vector supercomputers for the energy industry in the ‘80s, to heading up the Laboratory for Parallel Computation at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) in the ‘90s. He has worked closely with industry and academia in developing and deploying advanced computational technologies in the areas of seismic processing, remote sensing and image processing for climate and land cover dynamics, radio astronomy, as well as advanced networking architectures and technologies. Mr. Sobieski holds a BS in Computer Science from the University of Houston.

Current research interests and activities include design and modelling of application specific network topologies for resilience, security, and deterministic performance; multi-terabit photonic packet switching and transport architectures for distributed computing and grid architectures; and the design and engineering of global network infrastructure.

Mr. Sobieski resides outside Washington DC in suburban Maryland with his wife and three children.

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Over the Horizon: Global Networking and the Emerging R&E Environment

Abstract:

Globalization is the economic, social, cultural, and political interactions of people and organizations around the world regardless of their historical physical location. The Internet has been a key enabler for this trend over the last 20 years.

Globalization of collaborations and eScience infrastructure is exemplified in fields such as high energy physics and radio astronomy. It is also exhibited in the global distribution of enterprise IT facilities of multi-national corporations. The scope of such globally distributed activities is increasing and poses significant challenges for future network architectures and engineering.

For example: cluster computing, long seen as an important research resource for the academic community, is seeing broad adoption within the business world now as well. Increased ability to capture and integrate huge scientific or consumer data sets using "grid" technologies is driving the deployment of larger clusters

However, the processor count in these clusters are growing faster than Moore's Law is able to reduce their size and power consumption - ironically reversing the trend towards smaller server environments and resulting in larger data centers and more sophisticated (and complex) networking requirements. And consequently generating increased costs in terms of power, cooling, reliability, operations, management, and business continuity risk.

Other trends such as growth of FTTH and "triple play" services pose the prospect of fundamentally different offered traffic loads at the edges of the network and substantially different performance requirements exhibited by the network core.

This talk will explore some of these emerging issues and applications that will drive network research and architectures over the next several years.

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Jim DeRoest, Director, Streaming Media Technologies

Bio:

deroest@researchchannel.org
1-877-616-7265
Jim DeRoest directs a research, development and support team focusing on the cyberinfrastructure surrounding multimedia capture, digitization, management and delivery for ResearchChannel, UWTV, KEXP radio and the University of Washington campus. Jim is also involved in audio/video middleware research, data and computational grid forums and international collaboration and outreach efforts with PRAGMA (Pacific Rim Applications and Grid Middleware Assembly), CANS (Chinese American Networking Symposium) and WUN (Worldwide Universities Network).

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About ResearchChannel

Abstract:

Jim DeRoest from ResearchChannel will talk about how ResearchChannel was formed to bring the work of distinguished thinkers and scholars to a global audience through the creation of broadcast quality video resources. He will discuss the DigitalWell architecture that manages digital collections and creates a dynamic multimedia web interface. Jim will also explain how ResearchChannel has taken a lead role in the development of media technologies such as High Definition Video broadcasting.

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Speakers

Network Infrastructure and Architecture

Network Management

Collaboration

Network Security

Wireless Technologies

Video Technologies

Management and Governance

To be Decided

Birds of a Feather

  • Session 1 – Video conferencing and web streaming – a chance to discuss issues, ask questions and make suggestions to AARNet and the sector (Jason Bordujenko & Brett Rosolen, AARNet)
  • Session 2 – Real Time Communications – a chance to discuss issues, ask questions and make suggestions to AARNet on the types of services that are in demand whether these are current or emerging. It is also a chance to provide feedback on the current services and to discuss campus related issues. (Peter Johnson & Kewin Stoeckigt, AARNet)
  • Session 3 – MCU Review Group – an opportunity to hear what the group are doing, the benefits of participating and what lies ahead for the group until early 2008.
  • Session 4 – QRNO Member’s Network Architecture and Design Working Party (Peter Kurtz (QUT), Merv Connell (CQU))


Andrew McRae, Senior Software Engineer, Google Inc

Bio:

Andrew McRae is a senior software engineer at Google Inc., based in the Sydney Engineering office. Andrew has over 26 years of experience in the networking and computing industry.

Previously, for 3 years he was employed as the Senior Principal Engineer at NetDevices Inc. (acquired by Alcatel in May 2007). Prior to that, 8 years with Cisco Systems as a Distinguished Engineer in the Routing Technology Group, working on next generation router architectures.

He has filed twelve patents in networking and related technology, and has published numerous papers in the field of Routing, Linux/Unix, Local Area Networking, Internet Engineering etc. He is a founding member and current director of the Australian Chapter of the Internet Society.

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Google Australia Engineering

Abstract:

Australian innovation has led the way in many fields. It is not widely known that the immensely popular Google Maps was invented and developed in Australia. This led to the establishment of the Google Sydney Engineering centre, where teams of engineers are working in several key areas of innovation and development. The main areas of focus for Sydney Engineering are Geo (maps), Google Apps, and Infrastructure (with an emphasis on networking). This talk outlines the underpinnings of the Google Maps development, and discusses the challenges and technical details of how Google is "Organizing the World's Information", especially in the areas that are the focus for the Sydney Engineering office.

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Dr. Landfeldt, School of Information Technologies, The University of Sydney

Bio:

Dr. Landfeldt started his studies at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. After receiving a BSc equiv, he continued studying at The University of New South Wales where he received his PhD in 2000.

In parallel with his studies in Sweden he was running a mobile computing consultancy company and after his studies he joined Ericsson Research in Stockholm as a Senior Researcher where he worked on mobility management and QoS issues. In November 2001, Dr. Landfeldt took up a position as a CISCO Senior lecturer in Internet Technologies at the University of Sydney with the School of Electrical and Information Engineering and the School of Information Technologies.

Dr. Landfeldt has been awarded 8 patents in the US and globally. He has published more than 50 publications in international conferences, journals and books and been awarded many competitive grants such as ARC discovery and linkage grants. Dr. Landfeldt is also a research associate of National ICT Australia (NICTA) and the Smart Internet CRC. Currently, he is serving on the editorial boards of international journals and as a program member of many international conferences and is supervising 8 Ph. D students.

Dr. Landfeldt's research interests include; wireless systems, systems modeling, mobility management, QoS and service provisioning.

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New developments in Wireless Networking Research

Abstract:

Wireless Local area networking technologies are being deployed at a very fast rate. The initial deployments were primarily campus and enterprise networks and much initial product focus was placed on management tools and site planning tools. However, with the decrease in price for the network nodes has also emerged a strong residential market where prerequisites and conditions are very different. In addition, there has been recent strong interest in deployment of infrastructure using IEEE 802.11 based nodes in public network settings. The two latter deployments have in common that they take place in public space and therefore WLANs have to coexist and share radio resources. The IEEE standards family was not designed for such deployments and it has been shown that there can be severe impact on performance as a consequence. In this talk, we will detail the reasons for this potential threat to 802.11 and the research that has emerged to alleviate the problems. We will present the new idea of self contained wireless networks and how they make up a natural progression to WLAN in public settings. We will further give a brief view of the problems another emerging wireless research area, underwater networks. Such networks can become instrumental in a vast array of maritime settings ranging from submerged structure monitoring, maritime industries and scientific research. Currently it is very costly to place and harvest information from underwater sensors and networking would enable cheap management and collection of data. Example uses might be monitoring of ecosystems on the Great barrier reef, monitoring of temperature, salinity and pollutants over correlated larger spaces etc. Underwater networks are a very young and exciting research area because of the inherently difficult environment, poor path propagation characteristics etc.

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John Stevens, Deakin University

Bio:

John Stevens is a Unix Team Leader at Deakin University. He has implemented eduroam at Deakin and has a background in Communications and Security, mostly through working in diverse industries, from Process Control/SCADA systems and integration to Defence systems.

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Supporting secure wireless roaming with eduroam at Deakin University and details about the proposed eduroam user group

Abstract:

A presentation on a proposed eduroam user group that would provide self-support to the Australian community, raise the profile of eduroam and lobby eduroam deployments and policy matters within Australia and more broadly across the APAN region. This group also has the opportunity to become actively involved in eduroam next generation development activities to integrate SAML and RADIUS based access control schemes so that eduroam and shibboleth can co-operate under the same single sign on federated framework.

Deakin University's implementation of Eduroam for both Deakin Staff and Students and for visiting people posed several challenges. John will discuss these challenges, how they were addressed, and why decisions were made that enabled Deakin to support it's existing centralised IT services, while adhering to the Eduroam Standards.

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Carl van Wyk, James Cook University

Bio:

Carl has over 20 years data communications experience across the energy, airline, defence and University environments and has worked in South Africa, the UK as well as Australia. He is the current Communications Infrastructure Manager in charge of Data and Voice systems at James Cook University and had primary responsibility for the project.

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Network Application Performance Monitoring at JCU

Abstract:

A description of the system developed at JCU to monitor network application performance from the clients' point of view.

It was not intended to replace the current application state monitoring performed by the Computing Infrastructure (Sys Admins) group but add to the network section's understanding of how those applications are perceived by the user.

This paper will describe the frustration of network engineers and network users to agree on when the “network is slow”.

JCU have deployed many network monitors in various locations on the JCU network that monitor the performance of DNS, Web, Mail, FTP, ping, etc. to determine how the network and more specifically network application response is perceived by the user.

The system was built with inexpensive single board computers (SBC) running a Read Only Linux distro saved on a flash drive. This preserves system integrity and allows an easy return to a known state.

The remote SBC's run Nagios clients and all statistics are kept and graphed on a central Nagios server.

The graphing of network application response from various locations on the network quickly shows whether there is a network problem and more importantly whether it is location specific or application specific or even that it may just be that specific user's experience.

The paper will describe the search for a suitable (cheap!) SBC and Linux distro.

This project is a work in progress at JCU and may be developed further by the QRNO to fully document and “shrink wrap” it for use at other universities.

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Cecil Goldstein

Bio:

Cecil Goldstein is the Training Manager for APNIC, responsible for the development and management of APNIC's training and education activities. Prior to this, Cecil was a lecturer in the Faculty of Information Technology at the Queensland University of Technology, focussing particularly on internetworking subjects. He has been involved in Internet training and support from the initial AARNet days

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The structure and management of addresses in the Internet today

Abstract:

This presentation will cover:

  • The structure and management of addresses in the Internet today.
  • The history and role of the RIR system and of APNIC in particular. Requesting and obtaining Internet address space.
  • Internet address and management policies: what they are and how they are formed,
  • The current state of IPv4, and the deployment of IPv6.

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Chris Willing, QCIF Access Grid Manager

Bio:

Chris is the QCIF Access Grid Manager, currently based at the University of Queensland Vislab since 2004. His interest in high quality audio and video dates back several years to his time at the Australian Broadcasting Commission. After that, he was at the University of Sydney, firstly in the Television Services Department and later at the Sydney Regional Vislab. Along the way he collected an honours degree in Computer Science. Chris' involvement with the Access Grid began in 2001, when he built Australia's first Access Grid node at USydney's Vislab at the Australian Technology Park. This node was also the first to use an all-Linux design which was replicated in subsequent early AG installations around Australia. Chris also set up the original Asia Pacific Access Grid venue server and still maintains the current AG2 and AG3 servers. He was the Collaboration Support Infrastructure Project leader in the APAC2 Program which funded the "High Quality Video" project to add DV & HDV capabilities to the Access Grid.

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Leon Zadorin, Research Assistant, the University of Queensland Vislab

Bio:

Leon is a research assistant at the University of Queensland Vislab. He's currently developing the high quality video enhancements to vic, the video tool used in the AccessGrid infrastructure, in particular the addition of DV & HDV support. His formal qualifications range from a Bachelor of Music at Queensland Conservatorium of Music to a Master to Fine Arts and a Master of Information Technology at QUT. In addition, he has a diverse mix of previous programming experience, at different times involving forensic recordings analysis, audio & video signal processing, encryption applications and relational databases.

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Extending vic for DV/HDV in the Access Grid

Abstract:

This presentation will describe the work at University of Queensland Vislab to enhance the well known vic video tool. It will include justification for initially using vic at all, in particular the need to provide a DV/HDV solution suitable for all platforms currently being used for Access Grid nodes. Apart from the changes needed in order to both capture and render multiple DV/HDV streams, we have implemented other changes including traffic shaping (to prevent overwhelming under-resourced network equipment) and resizeable vic windows (to accommodate multiple large format streams in restricted display situations). The many issues leading to these changes will be discussed.

The presentation will also address the ramifications of introducing such high bandwidth media streams (typically 30Mb/s each) in AG sessions whose participants' network capabilities may vary considerably. In addition to traffic shaping in vic itself, a new family of {DV,HDV}Video*Services will be described which allow session participants to choose which remote DV/HDV streams to view prior to any DV/HDV traffic appearing on their networks.

Although this is a “work in progress”, it is well advanced. A Linux version is nominally complete and has been tested in a variety of situations for some months now. A Windows XP version is in active development; a DirectDraw renderer is complete and the balance expected to be complete by the time of the QUESTnet conference. A Macintosh OSX version has also been commenced in an external institution (with our guidance) and it is hoped that this too will be ready by that time. Finally, the presentation will address the problem of built-in latency of camera derived HDV streams; firstly in terms of mitigating its effects and, secondly, in terms of how to utilize raw component streams from the camera to transmit in either uncompressed or machine compressed formats.

If possible, a demonstration with multiple remote DV/HDV streams can be part of the presentation.

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Colin Blythe, Manager, Networks & Telecommunications, the University of Melbourne

Bio:

A Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical) from the University of Canterbury led to a career in telecommunications and IT. Career highlights have included: hardware and software design; system design and implementation projects; user support; and consulting roles with corporate and financial institutions, such as New Zealand Post, AWA, Unisys, Australia Post, Accenture and ANZ. Melbourne Uni is my first role in the education sector.

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Networking Landscape at the University of Melbourne

Abstract:

The University of Melbourne is undergoing a radical transformation in the manner it delivers teaching and learning, through the Growing Esteem strategy. In 2008 the University begins teaching its new undergraduate degrees a new set of 6 undergraduate degrees, and down from 96.

Information Services (the central IT and library group) is also in the middle of significant business changes as it begins to deliver a set of services to the whole University as part of a Shared Services model. The University is also part way through its implementation of the ITIL framework and processes, and Prince2 as the standard project management methodology.

This sets the business context in which a number of major network and infrastructure renewal initiatives, including a major replacement cycle for its underlying voice and data network infrastructure, and changing how the networks are managed.

The presentation will outline the business changes underway at the University, and how these have impacted on, and changed, the network technology refresh initiatives in progress at Melbourne.

The presentation will also report on progress to date on core underlying network technology change initiatives since my 2005 QUESTnet presentation, including:

• Core Network Renewal – progress to date on the technology refresh of the University's core network
• EndPoint Management – a philosophical change for Melbourne – have the entire network managed by a centralised function. Where are we at, and what problems have had to be resolved
• Telephony Renewal – a progress report on the renewal of the telephony technology
• Wireless Renewal – what has driven this initiative

The presentation will discuss why these are the core thrusts for networking at Melbourne, and what has been achieved in the journey so far, what has been learned and what has yet to be achieved.

Finally the plans for the next 3 years will be outlined to demonstrate how the planning will develop into real deliverables, supporting the major business transformation being undertaken at the University of Melbourne.

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Danny Thomas, Software Infrastructure, the University of Queensland

Bio:

Danny has been working in IT support at UQ for 20 years; the last 6 with Information Technology Services.. He is responsible for DNS, DHCP and NTP services, but spends a significant amount of time keeping network records up to date.

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A simple portal for combining & comparing silos of network information & configuration

Abstract:

Combining Information

UQ network information is maintained in a database system called Pizza. This repository is organized around our address-space with an entry for each CIDR block, whether routed or not. There are other tables for VLANs, Routers, Contacts and so forth.

While that repository is useful, I've developed a portal for combining that information with other sources of network information such as DNS, DHCP, netflows and Organizational structure.

A URL of http://uqnet.cc.uq.edu.au/display/ip/130.102.2.53 will show:

  • all local DNS names resolving to that ip-address
  • when that ip has been active (from netflows)
  • what VLAN it belongs to
  • which in turn has info
  • the router(s)
  • whether the VLAN is configured on the DHCP servers
  • for each subnet
    • gateway
    • whether subnet due for renumbering
    • number of active ip's, etc
    • OrgUnit (with link to contacts)

A URL of http://uqnet.cc.uq.edu.au/display/ou/library will show all networks used by the library.

And there are other comparable URLs for displaying VLANs, CIDRs, etc.
There's also simple reports such as

  • list VLANs sorted by the number of subnets on them
  • list VLANs sorted into those with public, private, public+private blocks
  • list server ip-addresses no longer active but still in the DNS
  • list ip-addresses making the most DNS-queries
  • list the most common DNS-queries
  • list DNS zones grouped into various classes, and whether master/secondary
  • list name-servers running on the network
  • list host-count by Faculty or Site

Comparing Configurations

While combining disparate data sources into a richer composite is very convenient, I think comparing related configuration info is even more important. Many services depend on several systems being appropriately configured. For example DHCP requires relaying to be configured on the router(s) for the VLAN, and for the DHCP server to be configured with that VLAN. The portal is a place with access to both of these configurations and there is a script to:

  • confirm the set of VLANs with relaying exactly matches the set of VLANs in the DHCP config
  • that relaying uses both DHCP server ip-addresses
  • that the VLAN in the DHCP configuration has the complete list of subnets from the router configuration, and their gateways

There a suite of other consistency checking scripts in the portal including

  • bogon filtering on the edge of the network matches Team Cymru site's
  • DNS checking, perhaps the best open-source implementation a by-product is a file listing each ip-address along with all local DNS names evolving to it, including CNAMEs to CNAMEs
  • that subnet router(s), VLAN, gateway, HSRP & static-routes from router configurations matches that listed in the Pizza repository
  • routed address-space exactly matches reverse DNS
  • sendmail mailertables exactly corresponds to DNS MX/A records

Forthcoming work will focus in router configs, particularly checking them against a standard "template". While various configs are brought together, there's no element of change management as would be found in a CMDB. On the other hand, the configs are inspected to
report issues which is beyond the scope of the classical CMDB.

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David Calello, Technical Manager, VERNet Pty Ltd

Bio:

Position held within the Fixed Telecom Network (FTN) project, which was developed to design and build a new national telecommunications network for the UK rail industry.

Bachelor of Engineering (Communications)

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Geoff Huston

Bio:

Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre, with active research interests in routing and addressing, network architecture, quality of service and network management and operations. He is an active member of the IETF, and currently chairs three working groups concerned with Routing Security, Routing Operations and IPv6 Multihoming. He has been a member of the Internet Architecture board from 1999 until 2005. He has been involved with the Internet since the late 1980's, and was AARNet's initial employee as the Network Technical Manager.

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Say Goodbye to IP version 4?

Abstract:

As predicted over a decade ago, we are nearing the end of the remaining address pools of IP version 4 addresses. How much longer have we got? What are the options for network managers and users?

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Glen Turner, AARNet

Bio:

Glen Turner is the AARNet South Australia Regional Network Manager.

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Applications and network throughput

Abstract:

A considerable effort has been made to reach acceptable performance for file transfers across fast, long networks by computer science researchers, network engineers and operating systems' programmers. If people use a recent operating system across well-engineered networks then they can now gain acceptable file transfer performance with a small amount of tuning. The story is not so rosy for application performance. Applications programmers and system administrators make choices which lead to poor network throughput. This is not unexpected: when databases were new programmers and administrators had to learn some of the technology behind databases to gain acceptable SQL performance.

This talk tells applications programmers and systems administrators what they need to know to gain acceptable performance across fast, long networks. It explores which design choices and algorithms help or hinder application performance once the user moves from across the LAN to across the world.

Pre-requisites: A previous QUESTnet talk <http://www.aarnet.edu.au/~gdt/presentations/2005-07-07-questnet-transfer/> is well worth reviewing beforehand, many physics and astronomy researchers are aware of this topic but this may not be the case for the information technology service teams.

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Dr. Greg Wickham, AARNet

Bio:

Greg was appointed to the role of Program Manager, e-Research in November 2006 to provide a direct conduit for researchers to interact with AARNet. Prior to this he worked in the Infrastructure Development Group (AARNet) and as the GrangeNet Network Operations Manager. At GrangeNet, in addition to maintaining the network on a day-to-day basis he liaised with the R&E community (both Australian and International); conducted workshops on network technologies; co-designed the GrangeNet II architecture in collaboration with Cisco optical engineers; and provided support for activities that used the GrangeNet network. Historically prior to joining GrangeNet he had several roles at Deakin University: tutoring and lecturing in the School of Computing and Mathematics, and finally Network Section Leader (ITSD). He has a PhD in Computer Science.

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AARNet: Serving the Academic and Research Community

Abstract:

Since it was formed in 1989 AARNet has had a pivotal role in providing network services to the Australian R&E community. From initially operating as a contract management entity it has grown to operate its own network that comprises of over 120 routers and with a foot print that stretches from Europe through Asia and Australia then across to Hawaii and North America.

The complexities of the modern internet have introduced many issues that can hinder or limit a researcher's ability to achieve full productivity. Hence in parallel with the growth of the AARNet it has been necessary to actively engage with the research community. Initially the GrangeNet program brought to the attention of the R&E community the capabilities and responsibilities associated with high bandwidth networking. The AARNet3 network then introduced a new set of capabilities that includes the ability to provision point to point gigabit circuits to North America and beyond.

This presentation will provide e-Researchers with the following information: an over view of the AARNet network and a capability statement of the organisation; examples of how AARNet is providing services for research activities; and finally a list of the products and services that AARNet can provide which are of particular relevance to the research community.

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VERNet Optical Network

Abstract:

What?
VERNet is building a layer -one all-optical network connecting over 100 sites across Victoria by the end of 2007.

Each of VERNet's shareholders (The 9 Victorian Universities and the CSIRO) will be delivered their own ‘private optical network'.

VERNet has either built/co-built optic fibre or leased fibre from strategic partners on long term (typically 20 year) IRU's.
VERNet builds are comprised of a combination of both G.652 and G.655 fibre. Leased fibre is generally G.652.

Members of VERNet will initially be provided with either dark fibre, wavelengths or Gigabit channels sub-multiplexed over wavelengths.

VERNet have contracted Nortel Networks to deliver a DWDM network capable of carrying up to 10 Gbit/s traffic today.

What are the benefits?

Technically
An ‘optical private network' gives members a network free of mixed data streams, shared bandwidth etc. Flexibility is one of the key drivers of the design as each network member has the ability to run whichever service they prefer. Plus they are able to route traffic however they want. This flexibility will also allow VERNet members to increase and expand their network to the level they envisage without directly impacting other members. Members will be able to build additional optical private networks with bandwidths of 10 gigabits per second for use by ‘big science' projects such as the synchrotron, radio telescopes, grid computing, data centres etc.

Physical Resiliency is a major advantage of VERNet. Whenever possible, members will be provided with physically diverse paths to their sites with no single points of failure. This, in conjunction with the flexibility of routing their traffic however they choose, gives the members an unparalleled level of continuity.

Operationally
Strong network management guidelines and operational frameworks are crucial for the ability of the institutions to realise the low cost growth that this solution is targeting.

Economically
The economics of scale that the collaboration that VERNet is the vehicle for enable the institutions to acquire a scalable underlying infrastructure that should match their growth requirements for many years.

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Dick Bussiere, CTO, Enterasys Networks Asia Pacific, Enterasys Networks

Bio:

As the Chief Technology Officer of Enterasys Asia Pacific, Dick is responsible for determining Enterasys' technical product direction for the Asia Pacific market. He also serves a security evangelist, frequently speaking at security events and conferences.

Prior to assuming this position, Dick served as the Enterasys Architect for Network Security. In this role he defined Enterasys' strategy for Secure Networks including the areas of including Intrusion Detection, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), firewalls, PKI and L2/3/4 security schemes. These technologies form the cornerstone of Enterasys' Secure Networking Strategy.

Dick was also responsible for the acquisition of key security technology companies, which bolstered Enterasys' product portfolio, including Indus River Networks and Network Security Wizards.

Dick was lead architect and team lead for one of the first virtual private network gateway products based on advanced network processor technology. He is the holder of several patents. Dick joined Enterasys (then Cabletron Systems) in 1994 as an engineer for the SecureFast switching group. In this role, he was responsible for the functional requirements and architecture of next-generation L2/3/4 switching devices, and for low-level firmware implementation of first-generation Enterasys Secure Networks products.

At Lockheed Martin in Nashua, Dick's responsibilities included hardware and firmware design and implementation of the communications subsystem of a large, multiprocessor surveillance platform, and of high-performance signal processing systems. He was also responsible for the communications subsystem development in the F22-Raptor Electronic Warfare (EW) system.

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Security Information Managers Simplifying and Improving Situational Awareness

Abstract:

Most universities have a wealth of security information available to them, from a wide variety of sources. In fact, many already deployed “traditional” devices can be leveraged to help paint the overall security position of the organization, including:

  • Switches
  • Routers
  • Firewalls
  • Servers

Additionally, security specific devices such as Intrusion Detection Systems, Intrusion Prevention Systems, and host-based applications provide a literal flood of data. The problem is that those tasked with monitoring this plethora of data are drowning in the flood! There is so much data being presented that it is impossible to keep up with it in real-time, using manual processes. In fact, most of the time the data is only examined after damage has been done, and this usually proves to be a most time consuming exercise.

Let's consider the actions required by a Security Analyst when using ‘traditional' security data collection techniques:

  • The analyst must prioritize the events based on attack type and the ‘value' of the asset being attacked – continuous, on-going process
  • The analyst must verify if the attack was valid when considered in the context of the asset being attacked – in other words, was the end station vulnerable to the specific attack – 3 minutes
  • The analyst must determine if the attack was successful – 10 minutes
  • The analyst must correlate events from compromised systems (i.e. backdoor activity) with the events preceding the attack – 15 minutes

Therefore, each event logged by the IDS results in a significant amount of work for the analyst to determine if the attack was legitimate and successful. By our analysis, each ‘attack' type event could result in as much as 18 minutes of work by the analyst. The problem is compounded when multiple sensors are in place, which would result in even more alerts and potential duplication of data.

When a real compromise is detected, then the forensic details of other previously unimportant events may become significant. It is necessary to manually correlate these previously unimportant events to help determine exactly how the compromise was perpetrated and what damage was done.

Although we have many data points, we need a way to efficiently analyze, prioritize and categorize this data to increase its relevance to the security position of the organization.

We introduce the Security Information Manager (SIM) as a solution to manage this flood of data, increasing the efficiency of the Security Analyst, decreasing the time to detect malicious activities, and increasing the relevance and utility of the accumulated data.

SIM technology correlates and sorts huge volumes of threat data and presents the security analyst with a prioritized and intelligently summarized list of events that require action. SIM technology dramatically reduces Mean Time to Mitigation (MTTM) by speeding the identification and pinpointing the source of “real” threats. Further, the security posture is increased through the elimination of unimportant events and data, allowing the security analyst to focus on what is really important.

We intend to introduce the efficiency gains through the use of a SIM by placing emphasis on the automation that a SIM provides, including: ~• Grouping related events together ~• Prioritizing events based on the importance of the device being attacked to the overall infrastructure ~• Prioritizing events based on the lethality and/or past history of the attacker ~• Prioritizing events based on the ‘credibility' of the event collector ~• Eliminating events which cannot successfully compromise their target ~• Reducing the number of events that the security analyst must deal with

Shown below is an example of data reduction ratio as seen with a commercially available SIM. As can be seen, the number of security events that the security analyst must deal with has been reduced by a ratio of 27979 to 1. This is done by automating the formerly manual process of event correlation and prioritization.

No data is lost through this process. The SIM maintains all data seen flowing through the network as well as the data reported by the traditional Intrusion Detection Systems.

We will emphasize the benefits of employing SIM technology:

  1. Time to detection and mitigation is reduced because there are fewer events that the analyst need examine.
  2. False positive rate is reduced because a much larger set of data is examined before reaching the conclusion that an attack has indeed transpired.
  3. Time to value in terms of the usefulness of the security system is reduced because the human interface presented by DSCC is far more intuitive than that presented by a ‘raw' Intrusion Detection System.
  4. Time to value is improved through automatic learning of network behavior and automatic learning of servers and clients on network.
  5. Through the use of behavioral analysis technology, network utilization and behavior can be better understood through knowledge of traffic types and volumes of those types.

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Brett Rosolen, AARNet

Bio:

Brett Rosolen joins AARNet the team from the corporate communications world, with specific experience over recent years with World Television delivering live event broadcasts over the internet for many of the top 100 ASX listed companies. His focus with AARNet is to develop and promote media delivery mechanisms for use across the network, and to progressively build the community of streaming media and content creation individuals. If you're involved (or would like to be) in digital video creation, capture or broadcast, feel free to meet up for chat, coffee (or beer).

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Educational Video - the Australian Landscape

Abstract:

This presentation will be based on a recent needs analysis of Australian institutions for handling their ever-increasing pool of digital media.

We'll take a look at present practices for capturing, encoding, storing and distributing media for many purposes, including recording lectures, digitizing existing media, and creating high quality productions for promotion and public distribution. We'll discuss the opportunities presented by the creation of Research Channel Australia, and allow for discussion toward building a model for media handling and delivery across AARNet3.

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Dinesh Divakar, Director Asia Pacific for Business Development for Voice and Applications, Alcatel-Lucent

Bio:

Dinesh Divakar is the Director Asia Pacific for Business Development for Voice and Applications. He is responsible for promoting and creating demand for Alcatel-Lucent IP telephony, unified communication applications, user mobility, collaborative applications and high-end contact centre.

Dinesh's experience within telecommunications spans 16 years, 13 of which with Alcatel-Lucent in a variety of roles including sales, solution design and product marketing.

Dinesh graduated Degree in Electronics Engineering from Premier Engineering College (NIT) formerly called Regional Engineering College Calicut in 1990

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Collaboration and networking

Abstract:

Alcatel-Lucent is leading the competitive transformation of its enterprise and government customers by delivering secure, end-to-end, business-critical communications solutions that enable new business generation.

To demonstrate our leadership in IP transformation, we will discuss our partnership with University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre.

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre (UPMC), the largest integrated health care enterprise in Pennsylvania and one of the leading nonprofit health systems in the USA, has teamed with Alcatel-Lucent to lead an IP network transformation project that will upgrade its data infrastructure, enterprise telephony system and contact centre platforms and applications over a next-generation converged network.

UPMC comprises 19 tertiary, specialty and community hospitals, 400 outpatient sites and doctors' offices, retirement and long-term care facilities, an insurance plan and international ventures.

This transformation will create a single network infrastructure allowing for efficient and effective utilisation of resources and enabling real-time communication both within UPMC and among key stakeholders and will reengineer all aspects of the existing voice, video and data networks.

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George Travan, General Manager, Jumbo Vision International

Bio:

George Travan is currently the General Manager of Jumbo Vision International, a company that develops tools for collaborative interactive environments.

George has more than 30 years experience in information and related technologies where he has worked in various capacities.

These include Researcher, Software Developer, Production Manager, Project Manager, IT Manager, Business Analyst and Consultant.

An award winning presenter with specialized interests in visualization, videoconferencing, rich media communications and collaborative environments, his role in Jumbo Vision enables a unique insight into collaborative technologies for business benefits.

Previous to his current role, George was the 'excitement manager' of the South Australian Virtual Reality Center.


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Collaboration, Communication and Cooperation with inSORS

Abstract:

Based on research from Argonne National laboratory inSORS supports multisite collaboration over broadband internet without the complexity of traditional conferencing systems.

A complete software solution based upon a grid architecture inSORS offers multipoint solutions - video, audio, data share, file share, distributed whiteboard, chat, record and playback.

Via handhelds and laptops to room systems, over low and high bandwidth connections, inSORS provides the opportunity for true productivity enhancements.

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Elaine Shuck

Bio:

Elaine joined Polycom in February 2005 as the Education Market Coordinator. At Polycom her responsibilities are to ensure complete customer and partner success, product development related the education and training segments and to facilitate industry utilization of educational technology. Prior to joining Polycom, Elaine was the director of the South Dakota Interactive Videoconferencing Smart Centers. Elaine also served as Educational Advocate/Instructional designer for South Dakota Public Schools. In this position she provided consulting in distance learning programs, medical education and corporate training segments. As a Distance Learning Coordinator, her role was to work with teachers and students to provide videoconferencing opportunities for curriculum enhancement. She has worked on a national and international levels to deliver training to educational groups on topics such as interactive and engaging videoconferencing, distance learning course development, instructional design and delivery and videoconferencing etiquette and protocol. Elaine is active member of the United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA) and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). She also serves on the Keystone Conference steering committee, a global conference dedicated to interactive videoconferencing users, as chairperson for the outreach committee. Elaine served as a Chairperson for the Interactive Videoconference (IVC) Showcase Committee for National Education Computing Conference (NECC) for 2006.

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Carol Daunt

Bio:

Carol Daunt is Founder and CEO of LearnTel Pty Ltd, a company that helps organisations improve their business operation by providing practical advice and training in skills for effective use of eCollaboration technologies.

Carol is an experienced educator and businesswoman who has been involved in the design, application and effective use of eCollaboration since 1986. She works with lecturers, teachers, trainers, health workers and management from government departments and private organisations throughout Australia, New Zealand, USA and Europe. Carol was heavily involved in the foundation of the industry in Australia.

Carol holds a Dip T; Grad Dip Dist Ed; B Ed & M Ed (Research) - her thesis investigated the nature of interaction in videoconferencing. She has been published in numerous journals and is a frequent speaker at international conferences, having most recently given papers in seven countries both in person and via videoconference. (Some of these are available at www.learntel.com.au)

Carol was Executive Director of the Australasian Teleconferencing Association 1995 - 1998 and was Chair of its Education Committee from 1992 - 1994. She is currently the Executive Officer for the Learning Technologies User Group (www.ltug.org). She is an active member of numerous industry panels, boards and committees.

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Collaboration on Demand

Abstract:

Networking is an essential part of the new classroom. Networked learning is here and students want access 24/7. In this session we'll address the new media that are changing the face of teaching and learning and discuss the implications for the networking technologist.

We'll also introduce the new collaboration on demand tools that are available to support networking and collaboration amongst educators around the world.

You'll be able to see high definition video conferencing and the new system available for the capture and distribution of video media and discuss telepresence and other future trends in education technology.

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Jason Bordujenko, AARNet

Bio:

Jason is AARNet's Video Conference Support Officer located in the Brisbane office at the University of Queensland. In Jason's previous role with the Queensland Police Service, he implemented videoconferencing solutions covering the Southern Queensland policing region and performed user support roles in user and desktop administration as well as a variety of system and project administration duties.

Jason's core focus with the Applications and Services team is the Video area within the Real Time Communications team which will see him supporting and expanding AARNet's internal video conferencing network, as well as working with the sector to support video conferencing within the sector both nationally and internationally."

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The AARNet National Video Conferencing Service

Abstract:

This presentation will promote the newly formed national video conferencing service, current priorities and longer term project aims. It provides an opportunity to see the services currently available and what is being planned. It is also provides a chance to share knowledge, experience and a forum to air your views on video conferencing and arrange for support or the opportunity for site visits to gather information on issues of local importance in the videoconferencing arena for research and higher learning.

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Peter Johnson, AARNet

Bio:

Peter joined AARNet in March 2007 as a Real Time Communications development engineer working in the applications and services team. Peter started his career at OTC in the late 70's and has since worked for a number of telecommunications carriers and vendors in roles ranging from technical support engineer through to product marketing manager. In AARNet, Peter will focus on creating an RTC network overlayed on A3 and designed to bring new, value added, voice and video services to the research and education sector.

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Real Time Communications Infrastructure Review

Abstract:

Peter Johnson will provide an update the community of the work plan and progress of the refresh AARNet's VoIP/Video infrastructure towards a more flexible easy to administer infrastructure to support a range of real time applications and services as opposed to separate structure for VoIP and Video. This talk will cover AARNet's service infrastructure and recommendations to AARNet customers about what they should do at their campuses to optimize access to existing and planned services.

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Steve Cox, Flinders University

Bio:

Steve is the manager of Communication Services at Flinders University South Australia. His role involves all aspects of providing telecommunication services to the Universities diverse community. Steve is also one of the two Co-chairs of the AARNet MCU review group responsible for improving the AARNet hosted videoconference service and developing a pool of shared resources and expertise across the sector.

Steve has been involved in AARNet projects since the late 1990s when the first voice over IP project to provide Toll Bypass was initiated; he was then invited to be a member of the AARNet IP Telephony Steering Committee which was disbanded early in 2007 as it became obvious the requirements for voice & video over IP had merged.

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The future of IP Video conferencing management and scheduling by the MCU Review Group

Abstract:

Steve will present background to this group and an overview of what it aims to achieve this year. He will cover progress made to date and the challenges and opportunities the sector can consider. Kewin will present details on the new web based booking system for the sector including details of the technical architecture and plans for further enhancements being developed later in the year such as port sharing, calendar integration, accounting and billing and centralized/distributed management of MCU systems.

AARNet new online booking system will be presented with a step-by-step guide on how to register to use it, how to book a conference and details of new features.

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James Tizard, MSc, CEO, SABRENet Ltd

Bio:

James began his professional IT career in the early 1980's at the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, and worked for the next twelve years writing software in a variety of public sector research environments. From the late 1990's he held a series of ICT policy roles with the South Australian Government, including eighteen months in the office of the Minister for Information Economy. James resigned from the state public service in 2006 to become CEO of SABRENet Ltd, a publicly owned non-profit telecommunications company. He still considers himself a public servant.

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SABRENet – Looking forwards

Abstract:

South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet) is a dark fibre network linking major Research & Education sites in metropolitan Adelaide. The SABRENet project participants are Flinders University, the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia, the South Australian Government and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO).

The initial construction of SABRENet was completed in December 2006, comprising 92 km of new underground duct and cable and 10km of member-owned fibre and duct space. SABRENet is owned and managed by SABRENet Ltd, a non-profit public company formed by the project partners. SABRENet forms part of the Australian Research & Education Network (AREN).

In the first instance, the SABRENet participants have used SABRENet to upgrade existing applications from microwave and carrier services to customer-owned dark fibre – in other words, “the same, only much better”. While this initial rollout has been a great success, the participants recognise that with the launch of SABRENet, South Australia's researchers & educators are now able to contemplate new high-bandwidth applications that were hitherto impossible.

The enormous potential of SABRENet was demonstrated to the local R&E community at the public launch of SABRENet, which was conducted simultaneously at two University campuses joined by dual high-definition video links running on SABRENet at 1.4 gigabits-per-second per channel.

The presentation will:

  • Show how the physical topology and business model of SABRENet encourage innovative new applications;
  • Summarise our thinking about how South Australia can take the best advantage of SABRENet;
  • Summarise new applications currently being investigated;
  • Describe some of the new challenges that SABRENet raises.

The presentation will be accompanied by maps, photographs and a video showing real-time classical musical performance over SABRENet.

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Wireless N in Enterprise

Abstract:

  • Covering where is the ratification process is up to plus how this will change things.
  • University of Canberra, achievements in education
  • ProSafe Switching – 10Gig, POE, Layer 2/3, Gigabit, Smart

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Jouni Stroja, Senior Network Engineer/Service Manager - Telephones, QUT

Bio:

Jouni Stroja is the Senior Network Engineer - Service Manager, tasked with the management of the Telephone Network for QUT. Before coming to QUT in 1994, he commenced work within the Australian Telecommunications industry in 1981 within the public workforce (Telecom) and later as a Communications consultant (Housley). Besides formal qualifications in Telecommunications, he also has an IT degree from CQU, and is currently completing an MBA (also via CQU).

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Michael Rings, Senior Solutions Architect – INTEG Communications Solutions

Michael Rings is a Senior Solutions Architect (Telecommunications) working for INTEG Communications who is the Telecommunications Infrastructure maintainer for QUT in Queensland. Before commencing work in the Solutions Architect Team of INTEG, Michael was employed as a Solutions Engineer within the Enterprise Telecoms sector of several companies in Australia and overseas with a total of 15 years experience. He holds an Advanced Diploma in Telecommunications from Deutsche Telecom. Michael is an Alcatel-Lucent Certified System Expert in Advanced IP – Telephony.

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QUT Telephone Number Upgrade Project (TNUP)

Abstract:

Due to rapid 'unforseen' growth, in 2005 QUT's Telephone network was down to it's last 800 telephone numbers (6500 in total). In 2006, a project was initiated to review/recommend and implement a solution that would: Stage (1) Meet the requirements of the Universities future telephone number requirements for the next five to seven years. Stage (2) Improve the redundancy and resiliency between the QUT Voice Network and the public network. In partnership with the Universities PABX maintainer (Integ), Stage (1) was successfully completed in late 2006. Stage (2) is planned for 2007.

This session will briefly describe the Project from 'end to end'. Highlighting the things that worked well, and those that we would do differently given the chance!

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Kevin Littlejohn, Director, Obsidian Consulting Group

Bio:

Kevin Littlejohn is Director of Obsidian Consulting Group, a company specialising in billing and quota management systems. He has spent the last few years concentrating on the University space, helping various Universities build and install quota management systems for their staff and students. Prior to this, his experience is primarily in the ISP industry, covering developer, systems administration, and the occasional network engineer roles.

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Quota management survey/case studies

Abstract:

I'd like to present a cross-section of what the Universities we're dealing with or have talked to are doing regarding quota management current, what they're planning on doing, and if time permits some detail on their experiences switching the systems live. Description: Over the past three years, Obsidian has installed and customised user-based quota management systems for a number of Universities.

This presentation will review the Universities that we've helped switch from IP-based to user-based quota management, and outline the decisions that were made about how to implement quotas, including who gets what and who manages the allocations. We'll also look at some of the Universities that are in the process of switching, or have planned changes to their quota management.

The aim of this presentation is to give interested parties some indication of what other Universities are doing, and what some of the traps and tricks along the way might be. People should come away with an idea of what's possible in their own networks.

Topics covered will include edge devices, types of login/logout, implications for shared infrastructure such as proxies and citrix-style servers, and devolution of quota management to faculties. I will be encouraging questions and conversation about the challenges other people see in their own networks and how they might be overcome.

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Leigh Costin, Product Marketing Manager

Bio:

Leigh Costin is responsible for the positioning, messaging, launching and market analysis of Blue Coat’s products and services for the Asia Pacific region.

Leigh has over 20-years experience covering product support, management, marketing and delivery across the Asia Pacific region.

Leigh has most recently managing technical marketing for Cleartext, a specialist IT security services company.

Prior roles included Director of Technical Marketing for the Asia Pacific region for Fortinet, a provider of hardware based integrated gateway solutions, and also Group Product Manager for the integrated security appliance group of Symantec Asia Pacific.

Earlier in his career, Leigh held senior technical roles focusing on network design and delivery with Symantec, Data General, Groupe Bull and Honeywell Information Systems.

Interests include; scuba diving, Sci-fi and surfing (badly).

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Security and Optimisation in Next Generation Networks

Abstract:

As enterprises evolve their IT infrastructure there is a trend towards consolidating applications and services into centralised data centers. This is primarily motivated by the operational ease and flexibility in such a centralised design. There is also an associated trend of outsourcing applications using the SaaS (Software as a Service) model that is motivated by economic and operational benefits. At the same time, the users of these applications, namely employees, business partners and customers are becoming more and more decentralised. They are accessing applications from remote offices, business partner's offices, roaming laptops, Internet kiosks, mobile devices, etc. Each of these access locations has different security and network performance characteristics.

Notwithstanding these trends, there is an expectation that IT provides access to all application and services in a high-performance, consistent and secure manner, no matter where the applications are hosted and no matter from where the users access them. Many security products address the needs of secure access to applications from any network.

While there are several products that address optimised application access over WANs with varied performance characteristics, performance is not everything. To provide a complete solution IT needs to satisfy both the security and performance needs of these applications and be able to work with the wide set of application protocols in use today and the growing list of protocols that may be important tomorrow..

This presentation goes into the issues and challenges faced with creating a secure and optimized multi-protocol application delivery infrastructure through a case study of a successful implementation at an Australian tertiary institution.

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Tim Horvat, Communications Manager, Networks & Computing branch, Information Technology Services (ITS) department, Victoria University of Technology.

Bio:

Tim Horvat currently holds the position of Communications Manager, Networks & Computing branch, in the Information Technology Services (ITS) department of Victoria University of Technology.

Tim has a Bachelor of Business degree in Computing, completed at Swinburne. He has held IT positions at Co-Cam and Swinburne, and has been employed at Victoria University since 1993. Tim has held various positions within the ITS department ranging from desktop support (supervisory and management), through Communications Project Manager to his current position. He is responsible for Victoria University’s communications systems, LAN servers, and telephony.

Over the past 14 years Tim has worked on a number of key projects for the University, including major communications systems and network upgrades, major tenders and services implementation. He is currently responsible for the implementation of the Victorian Education and Research Network (VERN) project at Victoria University.

He is based at the Footscray Park campus of Victoria University, and his latest challenge is the development and implementation of Victoria University’s Unified Communications Strategy.

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Daniel Sloan, Solutions Engineer, Procera Networks

Bio:

Daniel Sloan has over eight years of experience in the Information Technology industry, and has been heavily involved in traffic management and Internet billing systems for the past four years, including working for Victoria University to design their traffic management and Internet billing systems. He now works for Procera Networks developing traffic management solutions using the company's Packetlogic technology.

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Case Study - Victoria University Traffic Management and Internet Billing

Abstract:

A case study detailing the Internet traffic management and billing solution that has been deployed at Victoria University, covering challenges encountered, accomplishments and future developments.

In recent years, Victoria University has faced a number of challenges in relation to its Internet usage:

  • The emerging “social networks” and video services such as MySpace, Youtube, Google Video.
  • Rapid adoption of wireless usage across all campuses.
  • The conflict between providing open access to Internet resources for Academic purposes, and the growing cost of providing those resources.
  • Increasing virus activity, especially ‘Bot net' viruses.

Victoria University implemented traffic management technology and a billing solution to manage these issues.

  • Changing the attitude of users through Internet accounting and traffic shaping.
  • Limiting risk exposure by using traffic shaping to place a known cap on quarterly usage.
  • Managing and charging on different traffic profiles for Research networks using BGP routing tables.
  • Using real-time traffic monitoring to detect unusual patterns of activity – viruses, FTP “warez” sites, Skype Super-nodes - and to provide advance notice of unexpected increases in Internet usage.

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Mark Williams, Research and education business development manager for Asia Pacific, Juniper Networks

Bio:

Mark Williams joined Juniper Networks in October 2003 as the research and education business development manager for the Asia-Pacific region. Williams has been working across the Asia-Pacific region in telecommunications from his base in China since June, 1998 and in that time has worked on the development of data networking solutions for both enterprise and carrier customers.

Before moving to China, Williams spent more than 10 years working as a network engineer in the academic community, where he contributed to the architecture of both the first Internet backbone in Australia, AARNET, and its successor, AARNET-II and filled various roles in the design and operation of the University of Queensland data network.
Mark Williams

Williams previously worked for The University of Queensland, Siemens, The University of Stuttgart, Bay Networks and Nortel Networks. He graduated with Honours in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Asian Languages from The University of Queensland in Australia.

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Securing the Open Access Network: Best Practices

Abstract:

The Open Access Network is essentially a shared network infrastructure provided by a core networking team that supports service delivery for a variety of user groups and applications across an enterprise. In an Open Access Network, each user group and/or application has its own access control requirements and enforces those access policies with their own mechanisms OANs are most commonly required in multi-subsidiary enterprises like large manufacturing entities and financial institutions, state and local governmental agencies, and research and education organisations.

A key property of an open access network is the assumption at the network border to the Internet that, unless something is forbidden, it is allowed. There will be some overarching security policy that denies some kinds of traffic, but in general, access is allowed to and from the Internet. This poses some special challenges for the NOC personnel in terms of protecting the network while maintaining a relatively permissive edge, but it also focuses the perimeter task to one of: first providing high availability and manageability and robustness in the face of equipment failure and all kinds of DoS attacks; second, removing any undeniably unwanted traffic such as network worms, obvious attempts to breach security, network scans, etc; and third, instrumentation and logging of activity so that it is possible to determine when the network is behaving normally and when it is behaving abnormally.

This presentation outlines some current best practices in network baselining, DoS mitigation, building an intelligent redundant perimeter and realistic layer 7 security hardening at the perimeter of the open access network.

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Michael Demery, Chief Security Officer, Seccom Networks

Bio:

Michael Demery is the Chief Security Officer at Seccom Networks. Michael has worked, trained and managed in the Information Technology and Information Security area for the past two decades. During this time he has been a qualified trainer for such vendors as Checkpoint, Alteon, Biodata, Fortinet and many more. Michael currently heads up the security division of Seccom Networks one of Australia's fastest growing MSSP's who currently manage the edge network security of many of Australia's leading brand name organisations.

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Cybercrime – The Silent Business Killer

Abstract:

Will 2007 be the year where internet attacks become silent?

NOT silent as in they won’t be around, in fact we expect attacks will increase, but silent in that they will become more concealed, more targeted and will occur with potentially far more malicious results. One of the end outcomes of such attacks is that organisations dependent on investment may be less likely to report such attacks and decisions will need to be made to go public or not.

The presentation will discuss the risks, why these are likely to occur, the vectors for delivering such attacks and the end results. Also discussed in the presentation will be the fresh technologies and business approaches leading the way to meet the challenges and the Managed Security Business Model adopted by Seccom Networks, how this model has evolved over time and why Business and Educational Institutions should take a serious look at this model. The presentation will examine the Fortinet solution and why Fortinet has been and remains a constant within the model adopted by Seccom.

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Mike MacDonald, Senior Architect, Nortel Enterprise Solutions APAC

Bio:

Mike MacDonald is the Senior Architect for Nortel Enterprise Solutions APAC. He has been providing consultancy expertise for 4 years in the carrier environment and 5 years in enterprise for major customers throughout North America, Europe and Asia. His focus is IP networking and applications with specific emphasis on security, routing and VPN technologies. In addition Mike is a key evangelist for Nortel's CTO in areas of new technology introduction including acceleration, convergence, multimedia, etc. and is engaged in major account activities and conferences throughout Asia Pacific.

Mike holds a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering from Dalhousie University, Canada.

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Enabling the Agile Data Center

Abstract:

Service management has become increasing difficult as new data center requirements emerge. Of paramount concern in the data center today is power, space, air and manageability. Much of this is a result of inefficiencies in infrastructure utilization. Virtualization enables the creation of logical resources that share the same physical underlying infrastructure hence creating a pool of resources from which each service can draw. The Agile Data Center leverages several technologies including computing, storage, networking and services virtualization to deliver a new platform with increased flexibility, manageability and efficiency. It requires a combination of resilient networking, load balancing, virtualized operating systems and storage and improved scalability and utilization.

This session will examine the current concerns of data center operators and highlight techniques and mechanisms to address them with specific emphasis on virtualization. In general server, storage and network virtualization concepts have been applied with great success and are relatively mature. Now services virtualization products are beginning to emerge to round out the model. These products enable advanced data center capabilities including firewalling, intrusion detection and prevention, network access control and intelligent traffic management in a format that drives further consolidation of infrastructure, directly impacting cost and agility of services offered to end customers.

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Myles John Fenton, Network Engineer and Project Manager, Monash University

Bio:

Myles has been working in the ITS Network Infrastructure division at Monash University, Clayton Australia since 2001. The Monash network consists of 30K gigabit edge ports over 5 main Victorian campuses. The Networks team of 20 individuals consists of network engineers, network operators and dedicated project development staff. Myles has been leading development on a number of projects including Internet billing, Internet web & socks proxy services, university wide QOS implementation and network management tools for problem diagnosis and capacity planning.

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Application Aware Network Management

Abstract:

Application Aware Network management tools allow network administrators to identify network traffic by user groups, applications and QOS classifications and then perform traffic engineering techniques to ensure each application is provided with an appropriate bandwidth and latency path. Application Aware Network management can baseline the user experience for a given application and monitor changes in the network before services critically fail.

Monash University has moved to a Cisco 6500 routing platform and this has allowed Monash to make use of Cisco Netflow and IPSla tools to drill deeper than the port utilization statistics our previous management tools provided. The purchase of Fluke Netflow tracker and Fluke Response Watch in 2006 has allowed Monash fully capitalize on the routers Netflow and IPSLA features and provide much greater network visibility in problem diagnosis and future network growth planning.

Over the next 3 years Monash is converging our Data and Telephony networks. Fluke Netflow Tracker and Response Watch has given Monash the ability to track voice traffic through the network via DSCP markings and to baseline latency response, thus providing a confidence level to proceed with the converged voice/data network model.

The business benefits to Application Aware Network management include:

  • Reporting to business units and senior management which business units are using the network and the growth in network use of different applications and user areas.
  • The ability to build a baseline bandwidth, latency and jitter metrics for the network in a healthy state, to more clearly diagnose and resolve incidents as they occur.
  • To provide detailed real-time bandwidth, latency and jitter information to diagnose problems and monitor the effectiveness of the eventual solution.
  • Monitor and refine the network ahead of a VOIP roll out to ensure the network is VOIP ready.

A number of examples will be presented including:

  • identifying causes of congestion on slow WAN links
  • identifying applications in core network
  • identifying the magnitude and impact of backup traffic
  • identifying Voice traffic
  • identifying lab imaging

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Paul Ducklin, Head of Technology, Asia Pacific, Sophos

Bio:

Paul Ducklin is Head of Technology, Asia Pacific at Sophos. He joined Sophos from the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in 1995. He has held a variety of roles within Sophos, including running software development in the UK office, and heading up Sophos' global technical support operations.

One of the world's leading virus experts, Paul has given papers and presentations at many industry events including conferences such as Virus Bulletin, AVAR and AusCERT. He is an experienced and entertaining presenter, and a respected industry spokesperson.

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Will the next killer application kill your network?

Abstract:

This year's QUESTnet theme is _Networking on the Horizon_. One of the problems with the horizon is that it isn't very far away, and you can't see over it, which means that it doesn't take much ingenuity for an enemy to lurk just beyond it, and to sail up suddenly when your defences are down. (Just ask the Trojans, if you can find any, what happened after they towed that giant wooden horse into their city.)

Indeed, the QUESTnet organisers chose their words carefully in their overview of the 2007 conference, talking about us being _confronted_ with infrastructure demands for tomorrow's _killer_ applications.

So, what do we need to do to ensure that tomorrow's killer applications, technologies, protocols and network communities don't kill our networks?

Security, particularly against malicious code, is much harder than it used to be, and simplistic defensive advice, such as “get an anti-virus,” “applies critical patches," and "use some sort of firewall," is no longer sufficient.

This paper takes a 39,000-foot look at the many necessary components of a modern, flexible security regimen for a modern, flexible internet community. But to avoid being a lecture simply about policy and procedure, it zooms in on the latest types of malicious attack, with a live demonstration of a remote exploit and a rootkit, against which old-school computer security defences wouldn't have been enough.

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Peter Bahas - Senior Network Systems Engineer, University of Technology, Sydney

Bio:

Peter Bahas has been employed in the IT industry for over 20 years with 5 years at the University of Technology, Sydney. He has extensive knowledge and experience in the design, development and management of IT, network and security systems for corporate, government and ISP sectors. In his current capacity at the University of Technology, Sydney, Peter leads a highly skilled technical team of engineers and has worked over 100 projects, including the complete redesign of the University network.

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Seamless, Intelligent Wireless Networking with SSL based VPN Security

Abstract:

This is a presentation about how a seamless and ‘intelligent' wireless LAN network was implemented at UTS, providing secure SSL VPN based network and Internet access for staff, students and guests – without the need for user software or client installation This standards based wireless network completely automates the network connectivity protocols, high level security, LDAP protocol authentication, access control privileges and network management functions. The entire wireless system is an ‘intelligent' self sensing and self healing entity that requires minimum support for operations and expansion. The presentation will discuss the following:

  • Problems of the past & Lessons learnt
  • How we got to where we are
  • Initial objectives of the WLAN
  • Major issues of implementing the network
  • Key factors, standards based solution
  • The implemented technical solution
  • Technical benefits of the solution
  • The user experience – secure, clientless and seamless access
  • Network management – total control
  • Benefits to users
  • Benefits to UTS
  • Ongoing Issues

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Peter Elford, Public Sector Systems Architect, Cisco Systems

Bio:

Peter Elford is a fourteen year veteran at Cisco Systems and as the Public Sector Systems Architect is responsible for articulating an architectural approach to how networked technologies can provide positive outcomes for Australia public sector agencies. Prior to taking up this position in early 2007, Peter held roles as the Federal Region Manager, responsible for Cisco's engagements with the Australian Federal sector, as a Corporate Consulting Engineer working on residential broadband solutions and a range of activities related to network security, and as both a Technical Marketing Engineer and Systems Engineer.

Prior to joining Cisco Systems in February 1993 he worked for three years at the Australian Academic and Research Network (AARNet), where he had responsibility for much of the hands on engineering for the embryonic Australian Internet. Peter holds a BSc (Hons) from the Australian National University.

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Physical Security Convergence

Abstract:

Technology has delivered significant cost savings and productivity gains to the higher education and research sector through the convergence of telephony, desktop video and data applications. The technologies that underpinned this first wave of convergence, coupled with the existing advanced infrastructure deployed by throughout most institutions, can realise further savings and organisational improvements in a range of business functions related to physical security. These include security monitoring and surveillance, badging and identification and asset tracking.

This presentation will review the challenges facing multi-building, multi-site organisations in providing a safe working environment, tracking and safeguarding fixed and mobile assets, and authenticating and authorising access to resources both physical and logical. The limitations and constraints of existing solutions in addressing these requirements will be highlighted, and a range of solutions and technology elements that leverage IP-convergence will be identified that provide significantly better outcomes than existing standalone approaches.

Case studies based on Cisco's own experiences with such solutions will be highlighted.

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Network Design Report Presentation and BOF at QUESTnet

Abstract:

A cross section of network design Engineers from Queensland Regional Network Organisation (QRNO) will give a brief overview of their respective networks and highlighting future challenges. The report presentations will cover what QRNO members are doing/planning to do in areas like IPv6, IPTel, MPLS, Multi-cast, Datacentres, Firewalls, and Wireless.

  • Central Queensland University - Carlos Isaza, Senior Network Engineer
  • James Cook University - Carl van Wyk Manager, Communications Infrastructure
  • Queensland University of Technology - Bryan Thompson, Senior Network Engineer Projects & Anthony Croome, Senior Network Engineer NOC
  • Southern Cross University - Mark Angel, Network Engineer, Information Technology & Telecommunication Services
  • University of Queensland Network Design Report - Wilber Williams Associate Director Network Services

A BOF session will be held directly after the network design reports where a discussion will be held to explore future collaboration areas in network design.

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Bios

Mark Angel, Network Engineer, Information Technology & Telecommunication
Services - Southern Cross University
mangel@scu.edu.au

Mark has been at SCU over 15 years, in the last 10 years within IT&TS section. He has been heavily involved in the last three major LAN- WAN restructures. Marks main role as Senior Network Engineer is based around operations and security

Bryan Thompson, Senior Network Engineer Projects – QUT
bj.thompson@qut.edu.au

Bryan has over 10 years experience in the data communications industry, and has worked in government and service provider environments in the UK and Australia. He is responsible for the design and management of the data network at Queensland University of Technology, and is currently working on the development of a Virtual Data Centre.

Anthony Croome, Senior Network Engineer NOC – QUT
a.croome@qut.edu.au

Anthony started his networking career at the University of Queensland (UQ) where he worked for 8 years. He is currently the Senior Network Engineer for data in the Network Operations Centre (NOC) at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). Anthony is also enjoying the pains of studying for his CCIE Lab exam...maybe one day he will book it.

Carl van Wyk Manager, Communications Infrastructure – James Cook University
carl.vanwyk@jcu.edu.au

Carl has over 20 years data communications experience across the energy, airline, defence and University environments and has worked in South Africa, the UK as well as Australia. He is the current Communications Infrastructure Manager in charge of Data and Voice systems at James Cook University and is currently trying to manage the growth of data centre infrastructure as well.

Carlos Isaza, Senior Network Engineer - Central Queensland University.
C.Isaza@cqu.edu.au

Carlos has been a senior network engineer at Central Queensland University for 4 years. Carlos has a degree in Electronics engineering and a current CCNP certification. Previously, he has worked in South America with different IT and Mobile companies.

Peter Kurtz, Team Leader Network Operations Centre – QUT
p.kurtz@qut.edu.au

Peter is responsible for the design and management of the voice and data communication network at the Queensland University of Technology. Peter has an Associate Diploma in Electrical Engineering (QUT) and a Bachelor of Information Technology (QUT) majoring in Data Communications and has over 19 years experience in electronic communications.

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Patty McMillan, Project Manager, Middleware Action Plan, the University of Queensland

Bio:

Patty McMillan works for the University of Queensland as Project Manager for the Middleware Action Plan and Strategy (MAPS) project. She also chairs the AUeduPerson Working Group for the Australian Access Federation (AAF) and is an Australian liaison to the European Committee on Academic Middleware (ECAM).

Patty holds a Postgraduate Certificate in Management, a Master of Science in Library Science, and a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Mathematics. Patty has worked for Carnegie Mellon University and the Software Engineering Institute in Pittsburgh (USA), as well as Macquarie University, the University of Sydney, and the University of Queensland.

Her roles have included librarian, computer science research associate, web developer, web services manager, business analyst, and business integration manager.

Her most recent role prior to the MAPS project was as ICT Relationship Manager at the University of Sydney, liaising between the university's central ICT area and its academic and research areas.

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The Australian Access Federation

Abstract:

The Australian Access Federation (AAF) will link Australian higher education and research institutions together in a single trust federation to facilitate trusted electronic communications and collaboration. In order for this federation to operate successfully, agreement must be reached on the data schemas to be used with the federation, especially data schemas describing identities. This involves gaining an understanding of the various users and use cases for the AAF in the research and higher education sector. The AUeduPerson Working Group has been tasked with drafting and recommending data schemas for the AAF based on the community's requirements.

This presentation will describe:

  • What is a data schema
  • Issues to consider in developing an identity data schema
  • Schemas used in other federations, including eduPerson, UKeduPerson, and SwissEduPerson
  • Efforts to make schemas interoperable
  • Approach taken by the AUeduPerson Working Group
  • Progress of the AUeduPerson Working Group

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Russell J.N. Bovaird, Network Administrator, , La Trobe University

Bio:

Russell has a Bachelor of Computing and a Bachelor of Business (Accounting). He worked in private enterprise as a Computer Accounting Consultant at Communicat from 1994 – 1996, before joining the University of Melbourne as a Local IT Expert in the Education faculty.
Russell then moved to the Melbourne University Help Desk in 1998 where he stayed for two (2) years.

A move to Bendigo resulted from securing employment as the Network Administrator at the Bendigo Campus of La Trobe University, where he is currently employed since January 2000.

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Security precautions at LaTrobe University, Bendigo – How we track/locate infected machines

Abstract:

The processes of monitoring the unwanted elements of a network connected to the Internet are varied and unique compared with other types of monitoring. Whether it be virus activity or unauthorised users Network Administrator's and Engineers need to be vigilant about who and what is using the network.

The Network is always on and usually accessible to all, even to this day because workable network access control is still rare. However, any organisation connected to the Internet should show ownership and responsibility of its network and thus logging mechanisms are essential, but even the less technical security policies and processes are of great value when suspect activity is noticed.

Once the security breach has been noticed it must be investigated and explained. Scans of the computer, such as checking and probing open ports, listing active processes and applications, all help to discover if the particular computer is compromised – either by a virus (including worms and the like) or an active hacker that could be depositing a vault of cracked software on the compromised platform.

Having established that there is unauthorised use or software on a computer; the traits of the software are usually searchable by a search engine. Usually most viruses have signatures that are searchable and have antidotes available that can be applied and unauthorised software removed. In most circumstances the affected machines should be removed from the network. Formal takedown procedures are vital in this process.

Firewalls and other devices or utilities can be deployed at entry points for such malicious software. Whilst these will filter most of the offensive software not everything will be removed. Most critically, boundary utilities are a balance of useability and protection. The trade-off is the higher the protection, the lower the useability and vice versa.

This presentation outlines how such activity is discovered and eliminated on the network at Latrobe University, Bendigo campus.

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Shaun Wormald, Managing Director, Broadreach Services

Bio:

Shaun Wormald, B.Com (Computer Science) and a B.Com (Hons) in Informatics, is the Managing Director of Broadreach Services. Shaun has been active within the IT industry for over 20 years and has worked extensively in the ICT industry.

Shaun co-founded Broadreach Services in 2001, as the first specialist organisation in the field of IP based Visual Communications and Collaboration. The past 6 years have seen visual communications move from ISDN to IP and migrate from the boardroom niche, toward desktop and mobile ubiquity.

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Strategic issues for today's IP Visual Communications and Collaboration

Abstract:

You already have the foundation for building a robust IP Visual Communications Solution in your organisation! It is highly likely that you have sufficient network infrastructure by being connected to AARNet and have the resources to support visual communications and collaboration across your organisation – from desktop to boardroom and beyond the firewall.

This non product specific session discusses the strategic issues and aspects of today's IP Visual Communications and collaboration market and some approaches that will leverage many of your existing IT & T investments and deliver greater efficiencies and improved outcomes across your organisation.

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The Road to True High Definition Video Conferencing

Abstract:

Educational institutions are beginning to recognise the advantages that high definition brings to video conferencing. In the absence of professional lighting, makeup and camera crews, users are turning to technology to provide that true to life experience. The cost of the network and equipment required to support high definition will force a gradual migration. This session will explain what the major vendors are delivering, how to facilitate a smooth journey to true HD and how you can avoid unforeseen potholes.

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Steve Trickey

Bio:

Steve has been managing IT services for Flinders University remote campuses for 10 years in SA and, more recently in NT and Vic. The Remote IT group partners with a number of largely health related education and research centres to provide a comprehensive range of services including desktop, network, server, collaboration, video conferencing and web to groups largely involved in health education and research. His efforts most recently have focused on improving collaboration tools and eliminating the perception that remoteness means lesser quality of service.

As part of the CPD project, Steve is developing the IT component to enable a mix of video conferencing, web streaming and on-demand rich media presentations that can be delivered to a diverse range of health professionals scattered across the country. Fundamental parts of this have included assessment of rich media streaming products and collaboration with disparate regional network providers to identify and resolve issues surrounding infrastructure and network restrictions.

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Nobody left behind: professional development for rural health professionals

Abstract:

In 2007 Flinders University implemented a Statewide Allied Health Workforce Education Program (http://www.cpdforalliedhealth.org/) which seeks to support the continuing professional development needs of Victoria's allied health workforce.

The program provides concurrent delivery of material via live presentation, video conference and web-streaming of rich media (video + data). Presentations are also recorded for on-demand access tied to a portal aimed at increasing peer interaction and adding value to presentation material. The integration of these systems enables participants to obtain an experience as close as possible to "being there" irrespective of location and availability of resources.

Presentations are being held at regional locations around Victoria and the success of the program is dependent on the collaboration of a number of groups including regional health alliances. The program aims to leverage regional broadband networks and video conferencing infrastructure to improve the level of educational opportunities for rural health workers, ultimately leading to improved recruitment and retention.

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Thomas King

Bio:

Thomas has over 11 years experience as a practicing IT professional in the corporate and higher education areas. In his current role as the Network Services Team Leader at Griffith University, Thomas is responsible for the day to day operation and management of the Griffith University network which includes over 17000 ports spread across 5 campus' located between Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Thomas holds a B. Info Tech (Data Comms) and is also a Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) and Cisco Certified Design Professional (CCDP).

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Dale Blakemore

Bio:

Dale has worked for Griffith University's Network and Communications
Services division for the past eight years and is currently the primary
person responsible for developing a unified network monitoring solution
for the University.

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21st century Network Management

Abstract:

As IP based networks continue to grow in size and importance, so does the need for improved network monitoring and management. Near real-time, granular, reliable, useful and consolidated information on the network is invaluable.

This presentation will outline the system and tools that the Griffith University, Network Services team has developed to better monitor and manage the network (called the NOC internally). The presentation will cover the port database (GUPD), content management system (plone), network mapping, load monitoring, alerting and various other functionality.

If time permits; we will also cover how the NOC is used not only by the Networking team, but by the Infoservices Help Desk, desktop support teams and other support areas of the university.

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Tony Hill, BA, M Env Std, Grad Cert PSM, MACS

Bio:

Tony Hill established Capital Hill Consulting following a background in senior government and information management extending over two decades. He is now working to develop the capabilities and skills needed in organisations to participate successfully in a knowledge society.

In his role as principal of Capital Hill Consulting Pty Ltd, Tony Hill provides consulting advice on large scale research funding, including strategic research management and cooperative research arrangements. He has been instrumental in developing successful funding of a range of major research ventures in Australia and has been advisor to governments on establishing new programs for developing effective linkages and knowledge transfer between industry, universities and government research labs. Tony was formerly Manager of the Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) Program in the Department of Industry, Science and Resources. He has been involved in strategic research management since 1991.

His 20-year career in the Australian Public Service has spanned seven Commonwealth agencies, including Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and working for Ministers on both sides of politics.

He became President of the Internet Society of Australia in December 2001, having previously been the Society's first Executive Director during 2000 and 2001. ISOC-AU is the Australian Chapter of the worldwide Internet Society, the umbrella organisation for Internet technical standards and architecture.
Over these years, ISOC-AU grew in line with the popularity of the Internet to represent more than 40,000 Australian Internet users through its organisational and individual members. Now ISOC-AU is a respected voice in policy development and public debate, providing sound technical understanding of the Internet from its professional membership with a broad users perspective.

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IPv6 for E-Business - A Practical Initiative

Abstract:

IPv6 for e-Business is a project that took place from July 2006 to April 2007 for documenting, developing business tools, raising awareness and assessing readiness for Internet Protocol version 6, to build Australian capacity to take advantage of future innovation, especially in the area of business-to-business supply chains. This seminar explores the practical results of this project and identifies the opportunities in moving forward to IPv6 adoption. See www.ipv6.org.au for the details.

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Vanessa Sulikowski, Consulting Systems Engineer, Cisco Systems

Bio:

Vanessa has been working at Cisco for over 6 years initially as a Systems Engineer specialising in IP Telephony and IP Contact Centres for the NSW region in the last year Vanessa has been focused solely on Unified Communications for the Australia/New Zealand market as a Consulting Systems Engineer. Prior to joining Cisco Vanessa worked for Mayne Nickless for over 5 years as their National Data Communications Manager. Vanessa holds a BSc (Hons) from the University of Newcastle.

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Presence technology

Abstract:

Increased flexibility in work environments has created an enhanced need for visibility of an individual's availability and their willingness to communicate. Presence and active state information can enrich communications by providing this visibility. This session will provide an overview of Presence and its related protocols SIP/SIMPLE and how presence technology can be utilised to enhance collaborative communications.

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Bradley Beddoes, Lead Software Architect, Authentication, Authorization and Accountability Project, Queensland University of Technology

Bio:

Bradley Beddoes is the Lead Software Architect for the Authentication, Authorization and Accountability project at the Queensland University of Technology.

In addition to authentication and authorization systems I have also worked extensively on software design and implementation for projects such as QUT's real time internet throttling/accounting system and JEE technology based web portals.

Externally I am involved in a number of Open Source projects as both a developer on existing code bases and incubator of new projects. I am passionate about open source software and use of open standards and promote these wherever possible.

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Middleware, Standards

Abstract:

This presentation will introduce the new system developed at QUT to support the universities requirements for single sign on, authorization, user accountability and integration to external partners such as the Australian Access Federation from a single easy to deploy source.

I will touch on our implementation of the SAML 2.0 spec in both Java and C++ and how we use this in all facets of the system, as well as look at how easy it is to extend SAML 2.0 using our implementation.

I will discuss the systems ability to do true SSO from the desktop to the web tier, allowing users whom have authenticated to Windows (Active Directory) to automatically access content in the web provided by any web technology without any need to re-present credentials. I will also touch on how we intend to extend this to Mac OSX and Linux desktops in the future.

From the Authorization perspective I will discuss our lighter version of XACML dubbed 'LXACML', how we go about defining system wide policies in easy to consume XML and how we do secure centralized decision making of all authorization requests for services deployed at QUT.

Additionally I will touch on some of the benefits gained especially for audit purposes with having all systems authorization policies centrally stored and managed.

The biggest drawcard of this system is its ability to understand and translate externally facing authentication systems. I'll discuss how support for Shibboleth 1.3, Shibboleth 2.0, OpenID, Yahoo BB Auth and others is achieved without needing to modify applications, to allow users to access content in a variety of ways to promote true collaboration.

Finally I'll talk about why we decided to make this solution open source, reasons for our choice of the Apache 2 license, how you can get access to it to start trialling in your own environment and how you can become a member of the community being put together to support future directions.

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Davin Gibb, Systems Engineer, Cisco Systems

Bio:

Davin Gibb has been with Cisco Systems for 9yrs, and has spent most of this time in Technical Services, supporting the Asia Pacific region. Technically focusing on the Service Provider segment, Davin specializes in routing device operation and associated architectures. Recently joining the Sales organization, Davin is currently architecting next generation networks for Higher Education institutions throughout the ANZ region.

Davin Gibb holds a Bachelor Science (Computer Science), UNSW and holds dual Cisco Certified Internet Expert certifications in Routing and Switching, and Service Provider technologies.

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Segmented and Virtual Infrastructures (Topologies, Protocols and Security)

Abstract:

User mobility, increased demand for content and efficiency has driven the need for a new generation of communication infrastructures. Next generation infrastructures need to be flexible and easily adapt to future access methods and data demands, whether it be voice, video or content. As accessibility is increased the ability to account and secure a users or devices interaction becomes increasingly important. Different user classes require different access and authorization, next generation infrastructures need to be accessible remotely, wirelessly or wired while still being able to support the full suite of applications and services transparently.

Higher Education Institutions are increasingly faced with the need to collaborate with external partners, either regionally or internationally, to enrich academic research, innovation and educational content.

Next generation networks need to enable such communication quickly, easily and securely without damaging the integrity of the existing infrastructure. Whether the interaction requires network peering, video conferencing or communication presence visibility, the expectations are on the infrastructure to enable this with minimal risk and operational impact. With segmentation and virtualisation provided by such technologies as MPLS, virtual SANs, firewalls and servers, infrastructures are able to collapse into a central shared services model. This provides the opportunity for improvements in utilization, availability and cost of the systems supporting such services.

This presentation will cover the technologies and topologies needed from an infrastructure to support the current and future demands of an Institution.

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Dean J Bell, BorderWare

Bio:

Dean Bell brings over 13 years of international general management, business development, and sales & marketing experience across Asia and the Middle East to BorderWare. Prior to joining BorderWare, Dean was responsible for a number of start-up operations in the Middle East and South East Asia based in both Singapore and Dubai respectively. The latest of which being Scanit, a subsidiary of Belgacom the incumbent Belgium Telecommunications provider, in the professional services arena of security auditing, penetration testing and ISO17799 audits. There Dean developed the Middle East office and market from scratch building a solid business and partner model while retaining key clients in the region and expanding this into Asia Pacific. Prior to Scanit, Dean was a member of the management team responsible for the setup of Dubai Technology Partners, a company specializing in the incubation of foreign high tech vendors into the Middle East market, retaining vendors such as Tripwire, iPASS, Surfcontrol, Bindview and Borderware among others with high industry adoption and returns in the local market.

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Converged Messaging Security Threats

Abstract:

Converged Messaging Security Threats will highlight and discuss the transition of traditional threats to converged threat vectors, both inbound and outbound across multiple protocols resulting in the need for converged messaging security platforms. Securing converging networks utilizing next generation IP reputation and behaviour analysis as well as ensuring corporate and regulatory compliance and meeting personal data privacy requirements.

Addressing the next generation of inbound threats and outbound content control across multiple protocols including HTTP, SMTP, FTP and SIP/VoIP is imperative as we see for the first time voice and data converging on the same IP network exposed to the internet. Management of such a requirement sees the challenge between disparate point products and UTM’s and addressing this requires a game changing thought leadership solution that allows the use of a single policy that can be deployed across these protocols.

BorderWare: BorderWare Technologies Inc makes Internet communications safe. The company’s content and application security solutions enable customers to mitigate the risks and threats associated with Internet communications. Founded in 1994, BorderWare has developed partnerships and affiliations with some of the industry’s most prominent companies including Cisco Systems, F5 Networks, Kaspersky Labs, McAfee, PostX, Research in Motion (RIM), RSA Security, Sun Microsystems, Symantec and Ubiquity. More than 8,000 customers in 65 countries have selected BorderWare’s solutions for their superior security, scalability, business continuity and lower total cost of ownership. For more information visit http://www.BorderWare.com.

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John Mann, Senior Technical Consultant, Monash University

Bio:

Graduating from Monash University in 1980, John Mann spent 3 years in Canberra programming an OSI-model network for the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Since returning to Monash to work as a VMS system administrator, he has pioneered much of the networking at Monash.

John has worked on re-creating, improving and expanding the Monash network every few years using each new wave of networking technology from 2400 bit/s X.25 up to WDM and 10 Gbit/s Ethernet, and network protocols from home-made, DECnet and NetWare up to TCP/IP.

John was responsible for Monash's central e-mail hub for 15 years, and is still responsible for the DNS, IP addressing and routing. He is currently involved hands-on with various higher-level network management, planning, and e-Research projects.

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Case Study

Abstract:

The "addhost" database is a powerful and useful tool to record and manage all machines connected to the Monash network. It is central to the generation of DNS and DHCP records for 42,000 machines in Australia and South Africa, and for network access and usage billing. As well as information required by the network, extra fields track equipment and serial numbers, owning department, location, machine type and O/S, user and descriptive information. A rights system controls who can create records belonging to a particular department, and the creator and last modifier for each record is tracked.

The database has been extended and evolved to handle many types of atypical network connection types, and support tools have been developed to ease administration, and to monitor and report usage and exceptions. Students are allowed to self-register their personal computers, which are de-registered when they don't use the computer for too long or when they leave the university. IPv6 addresses are supported, but not widely used yet.

Along the way, several lessons were learnt about what to, or not to, put in the database, and how to keep it up to date.

The talk will also cover Monash's DHCP and DNS server architecture. The DNS setup is made scalable and highly resilient using Anycast IP addresses, and an overseas DR site.

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John Sims, IT Manager, Macquarie University

Bio:

John has 20 years experience in University IT management. He is responsible for the provision of IT services within the Division of Economic and Financial Studies at Macquarie University, which includes efficient management of several Student Computing Laboratories. John has a particular interest in applying technology solutions to improve efficiency in teaching, research and administrative processes, and has implemented several initiatives to enhance student administrative systems. He has been involved in collaborative eLearning projects undertaken by the University’s Centre for Flexible Learning.

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Ralph deVeer, Technical Consultant, AGM-IT

Bio:

Ralph has worked in the IT industry for the last 20 years, in a number of technical roles with vendors, end user's and with system integrators, and has held various industry certifications including CNE and MCNE, MCSE, CCEA and CCIA. He has had considerable experience with various technologies including: Novell Netware and ZenWorks; Microsoft desktop and server technologies; and Microsoft Exchange Messaging. With the increasing needs for effective remote access solutions, Ralph has acquired considerable experience with various versions of Citrix MetaFrame, Presentation Server and other Citrix products such as Web Interface and Secure Gateway, in addition to the core terminal services functionality provided by the Microsoft Server range of products.

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Internet Exchanges, Security, Social/Community Demographics, Flexible Learning, eLearning, Web-Based Learning

Abstract:

The Division of Economic and Financial Studies (EFS) is the largest teaching unit within Macquarie University, catering for approximately one-third of the University’s undergraduate students and almost half of its postgraduate coursework students. With such large numbers, EFS is continually seeking innovative ways of improving the quality of its students’ learning experience.

The Virtual Student Laboratory was devised to take advantage of recent IT developments to distribute our current Student Computing Laboratory SOE, by making it accessible to our students via a standard web browser. The objective is to enable students to remotely access student lab applications and data on any device, from any location, at any time.

After careful consideration, a Citrix server-based solution with a web browser user interface was selected. Secure authentication and data transfer were major considerations. The solution comprises the following components:

Citrix Presentation Server is used to deliver software applications, and control printing and file saving functions. It was chosen for its highly efficient and optimised thin client protocol, broad client support, enhanced printer functionality and session reliability

Citrix Secure Gateway is used to provide a secure Internet gateway between Citrix Presentation Server and client devices, without requiring a VPN. Encryption will utilise the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol with digital certificates. Authentication is primarily through AD, with an IDM connector to Netware (or Novell OES)

User interface consists of a web browser with the Java (J2SE) Runtime Client. Its major advantages include no client installation, minimal download size and platform-independence.

This presentation will outline the processes involved as the project evolved, from development of the concept and specifying user requirements to the development of a prototype environment with a specific subset of Lab applications, and student acceptance testing. It includes identification of the benefits for students and the University, technical and architectural specification of the solution, and future progress.

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Julian Lefebvre, Director of Business Development (Asia Pacific), Sonic Foundry, Inc

Bio:

Julian Lefebvre is the Director of Business Development in Asia Pacific for Sonic Foundry, Inc. Julian has been responsible for introducing Sonic Foundry’s Mediasite platform to the Asia Pacific market since 2004. Julian has worked in NZ, Australia and Europe for the last 20 years, building relationships and providing real-world solutions for universities and large organizations to take advantage of digital media technologies.

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Sonic Foundry

Abstract:

Imagine a world of not just 10 in a room, but 1000 online, all participating and interacting. Questions and answers being transferred via instant message, email or audio bridge or video conference links. As applications get built around these sorts of presentations & information, how do you extract knowledge to drive more knowledge exchange, participation and streamlining of information flow?

Sonic Foundry is helping organizations worldwide to automatically and easily communicate and create online knowledge. Online video is crossing the chasm – a feeling shared by leading analysts who are now stating that a cultural change is happening quickly in the way information and knowledge is communicated. The success of YouTube, Google Video, Flurl & others validates the business that Sonic Foundry has been involved in since 1992. Search has been the traditional way that people have used the internet, mostly from a text based aspect, which is one of the reasons why the Internet has grown. Advanced search technology is now needed to spawn and grow the new rich media communication medium.

This presentation looks at the challenges in managing, organizing and securing vast repositories of online knowledge and how to automatically search that vast repository to find the information buried in rich media when you know nothing about the content.

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Lance Heather, Senior Product Manager, NEC Australia

Bio:

Lance Heather is an electronics engineer who has worked in the IT industry for 38 years, working for International IT/Manufacturing companies such as Fujitsu, Digital, and Honeywell. He held senior positions in Sales and Marketing and Operations

Currently with NEC Australia as Senior Product Manager developing and delivering intelligent video surveillance applications world wide.

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Intelligent Video Surveillance

Abstract:

Recent world and local events are changing the nature of security. Today, there is a real possibility of attacks occurring not just against military targets but against civilian infrastructures like airports, distribution centres, transport, power plants, water treatment facilities and international hotels. In addition, the need to protect private infrastructures such as petroleum refineries, federal and state government facilities and large private distribution centres has risen immensely over the past 2 years.

The intense scrutiny being placed upon existing CCTV infrastructures combined with the changing nature of the threat is driving innovation in the market.

The idea is not to replace existing CCTV video surveillance and access systems, but to enhance them through the use of automated intelligence as part of the process of capturing video, thereby reducing the human error factor and overcoming human limitations in order to immediately respond (real time) to events.

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Paul Hardaker, IT Infrastructure Manager, University of Western Sydney

Bio:

Bachelor of Science and Diploma of Education from the University of New England. Has worked in IT since 1987, and in networking specifically for about 10 year from 1991. Has held the role of IT Infrastructure Manager at UWS since 2001, and has had a key role in a number of major IT infrastructure projects at UWS over that time.

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Wireless LAN Project at the University of Western Sydney

Abstract:

A project team comprising staff from UWS, Optus (AlphaWest) and Nortel designed, installed and commissioned a new wireless LAN across UWS’ six main campuses between June 2006 and February 2007. This involved the installation of over 400 indoor and outdoor wireless access points to provide wireless network coverage to all of the university’s teaching spaces, libraries, cafeterias and student residences.

Federal funding of a little over $2M was provided in 2006 for a new Wireless LAN system. Planning for the project started in 2005. A two stage tendering process selected Optus Business as the primary contractor with wireless LAN equipment from Nortel Networks. Installation commenced in earnest around the middle of 2006, and was mostly complete by the end of February 2007. The presentation will outline some of the functional and technical design issues raised, and the decisions, and in some cases compromises, made. It will provide some insight into the large and complex logistical installation exercise.

Technical Design
The presentation will include an overview of the technical design options considered for authentication, security, admission control and intrusion detection.

Security
Wireless networking presents a range of security challenges. The presentation will outline how UWS has attempted to find a balance between securing the network and delivering the services students and staff expect in an easy to use way.

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Stephen Walsh, Web Systems Administrator, ACU National

Bio:

Stephen joined the Infrastructure team at ACU after working with the Client Services area for over 5 years and following his work with Chris Myers on Eduroam. His day job allows him to dabble in Web System Administration on both Windows and Linux, DNS and Email services, as well as Windows Active Directory user maintenance.

In his spare time, Stephen is a member of the Linux Australia Committee, is a part of the Linux Australian Systems Administration team, as well as being a the Technical Team leader for the 2008 Australian Linux Conference.

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Disaster Recovery Made simple

Abstract:

Disaster Recovery is one of the hot topics for any Network Manager today. With many Universities undertaking Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery planning, many solutions require a manual intervention to start to recovery off. What if it all "just worked", even at if the outage occurred during the ITS Christmas party? With many universities investing in off-site data centres and dark fibre paths as fallbacks to their main services, how do you make sure you services appear seamless to the client and the public. Stephen will demonstrate a number of techniques like HA-Heartbeat and STONITH and technologies such as Multihomed-BGP for keeping your edge services running even when the worst happens, whilst minimising the Bus Factor inherent in most Disaster Recovery Plans.

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Stuart Bailey, Founder and Chief Technology Officer

Bio:

Stuart Bailey defines the company's technological vision and direction. Before founding Infoblox, Stuart held a five-year stint as technical lead for the Laboratory for Advanced Computing/National Center for Data Mining at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he led teams in developing advanced distributed data architectures. He has numerous publications in leading scientific journals, conference proceedings, and trade magazines in the areas of appliance engineering, high performance computing, database systems, and distributed data mining. Stuart earned his bachelor's degree in computer engineering from the University of Illinois.

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The Vision & Future of Core Network Services

Abstract:


Industry visionary and Infoblox CTO and Founder, Stuart Bailey discusses the future of Core Network services.

Core Network services are essential for all networks and applications. Put simply: without core network services, IP-based networks and applications grind to a halt. They provide the “glue” that binds networks, users, devices, applications, and policies.

In this informative and educational session, we will review how DNS, DHCP, RADIUS, TFTP and IPAM will evolve to support the demands of tomorrow’s networks.

Whether you are deploying IP Telephony or using Microsoft Active Directory, this discussion will provide you with valuable information to help you understand and architect your enterprise networks well into the future.

Stuart will briefly discuss the work that Infoblox did at Griffith Uni, QUT and the University of Tasmania .

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Implementing Unified Communications: Evolution NOT Revolution

Abstract:

Four walls no longer define a classroom — learning is a mix of online and face-to-face interaction, and students can communicate with faculty and friends from anywhere in the world. Unified Communications enable the virtual campus in the truest sense – allowing all aspects of an institution, both processes and the workplace, to be virtualized. Facilitating collaboration with faculty, tutors and fellow students, and access to a plethora of resources has become a business necessity.

Find out how you can leverage your existing technology infrastructure to realise increased productivity and an enhanced learning experience for teachers and administrators with a Unified Communications solution. Key infrastructure includes Active Directory and Exchange for Identity management and messaging, and your existing PABX infrastructure. Learn how you can have investment protection by building on your current PABX and keep existing phones.

Microsoft and Nortel have joined forces to accelerate business transformation with high-quality telephony services, flexible network architecture and easy-to-use desktop productivity applications. These capabilities provide staff and students with instant access to the information and resources they need, whether they are at a desk or mobile, while maintaining a highly secure, reliable network. With tight integration across existing and new products, the Nortel and Microsoft Alliance leverages Microsoft Unified Communications and Windows with Nortel’s telephony, networking and business application competencies. The end result is a Unified Communications solution which provides a higher return on education - more engaged students, more productive teachers, more cost-effective school administration and a more connected, secure learning environment.

This presentation will cover:

  • The ways in which Unified Communications address the four pain points that are driving the need for major changes in business communications
  • How CIO’s can be the change agents to significantly alter and improve the way individuals, groups, and companies interact and perform
  • The building blocks that CIO’s will use to create a Unified communications environment in their organisation
  • The true business impact of Unified Communications in incorporating communications, presence and federations into line of business applications
  • How the Nortel Microsoft Innovative Communications Alliance's is a unique, industry leading alliance that accelerates and simplifies the adoption of Unified Communications

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Mark Roberts

Bio:

Mark Roberts is the Business Development Manager for Queensland/Northern Territory/Pacific Islands, as well as being the Product manager/specialist for the Motorola portfolio of Wireless and broadband products division,, and specialises on the integration and implementation of Wireless and Broadband products to Government.

Prior to joining Lan1, Mark worked as the Queensland Manager for Wireless Service Provider Access Providers. Other roles included work as the Queensland distributor for Snapgear firewall systems, the Queensland distributor for Internet Security company Serverbits Pty Ltd, and as the Northern Regional Channel Manager for Intel.

Mark’s 20 years of experience in the IT industry, and his radio knowledge gained from 25 years as an amateur radio enthusiast building radios and antennas has contributed to the success that Lan1 is experiencing in the converging market of IP Communications/Wireless Broadband.

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Utilising IT in Education – Information anywhere at anytime in a secure environment

Abstract:

This presentation is designed to provide an overview of technologies now available for educators, how they can be utilized to make the education environment more efficient and accessible to the right customers, while making that environment more secure and responsive to those customers at the same time.

Technologies and topics to be covered included:

  1. Wireless Networks including mesh and point to point (fibre E1/T1 replacement) systems in both licenced and unlicenced spectrum
  2. Broadband Over Powerline technology
  3. Central Storage and automated soft asset backup/ disaster recovery.
  4. Electronic Network Security
  5. Physical Campus Security
    • IP Surveillance for Physical Campus Surveillance
    • Geo-location tracking and VOIP communications in a campus environment

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Rick Frank, Security Consultant, NetStar Australia

Bio:

Rick has over 10 years experience as a network engineer, and is currently a Network Security Consultant with NetStar having previously been with Network Rail (UK) as a Network Infrastructure Solutions Architect.

Rick has gained experience in the IT industry working through all levels of support, delivery, design, architecture and most recently Enterprise MPLS design and implementation. As an accomplished and experienced Cisco engineer, his most recent experience includes the delivery of key network security projects for customers including the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Goulburn Ovens TAFE and Stonnington City Council. Before NetStar and Network Rail, Rick worked for Atos Origin Consultant as a Senior Network Consultant and for Schlumberger as a Network Engineer. Rick is currently working with the University of Melbourne in the architecture, design and delivery of their new core network infrastructure.

Rick has numerous Cisco certifications including CCNA and CCNP. Rick is also studying for his CCIE Routing and Switching certification.

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Mark Thompson, WW Sales & Marketing Manager, Hewlett Packard

Bio:

Mark Thompson is the director of Global sales and marketing for ProCurve Networking by HP. He is responsible for overseeing the strategic direction and execution of HP’s ProCurve marketing activities as well as leading the global ProCurve sales team.

Since joining HP in 1983, Thompson has held positions in support engineering, product management, engineering management and strategic relations manager for HP’s relationship with Novell. Before joining the HP’s ProCurve Networking Business in 1993, his previous technology focuses at HP included HP desktop PCs and HP network servers. Since joining the ProCurve Networking Business, Thompson has served as Engineering Manager, Product Marketing Manager and as the Global Sales and Marketing Manager since 2000.

Thompson has a strong technical background and developed patented phone-line integration for use in mobile PC base stations. He has been involved in numerous channel and industry panel events on topics including a variety of future networking technologies and applications.

Thompson graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo with a bachelor’s degree in computer science.

ProCurve Networking by HP is the number 2 provider of Enterprise LAN solutions (accourding to the Dell’Oro Grup), offering a complete portfolio of Ethernet switches, routers, wireless, security and network management applications that allow customers to build Adaptive Networks.

HP is a leading global provider of products, technologies, solutions and services to consumers and businesses. The company's offerings span IT infrastructure, personal computing and access devices, global services, networking and imaging and printing. HP merged with Compaq Computer Corp. on May 3, 2002. The merged company had combined revenue of approximately $81.7 billion in fiscal 2001 and operations in more than 160 countries. More information about HP is available at http://www.hp.com.

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